Pure Storage’s coming high-end array: We have the details

Good post by Chris Mellor (thank you) over at El Reg

We can tell you a few more juicy details about Pure’s coming high-end array, and we’re deducing that SolidFire has a product capacity refresh coming.

What we knew was that the new range-topper would boast up to 1.5PB usable capacity using 4 and 8TB 3D NAND modules (SSDs). It would have always-on QoS, support thousands of virtual machines and be priced at less than $1GB/usable capacity.

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An overview of the new Virtual SAN 6.2 features

Good Post by Cormac Hogan (thank you)

If you were wondering why my blogging has dropped off in recent months, wonder no more. I’ve been fully immersed in the next release of VSAN. Today VMware has just announced the launch of VSAN 6.2, the next version of VMware’s Virtual SAN product. It is almost 2.5 years since we launched the VSAN beta at VMworld 2013, and almost 2 years to the day since we officially GA’ed our first release of VSAN way back in March 2014. A lot has happened since then, with 3 distinct releases in that 2 year period (6.0, 6.1 and now 6.2). For me the product has matured significantly in that 2 year period, with 3,000 customers and lots of added features. VSAN 6.2 is the most significant release we have had since the initial launch.

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NVMe fabric flash and deduping VSAN lead

The Future Road Sign with dramatic clouds and sky.

Good post by Chris Mellor (thank you)over at El Reg

EMC has new storage products coming in both external shared array form and in its converged and hyper-converged systems lines of products, using new VSAN capabilities.

These will be announced over the next two quarters and will change the shape of EMC’s product lines. We think we now have an overall view of what the mainstream product lines will look like.

This information comes from EMC’s latest quarterly results earnings call, from various sources, and from blogs by EMC VCE president Chad Sakac.

The background includes the point that VMware’s VSAN/EVO:RAIL/EMC VSPEX Blue products have not apparently been successful, hence the need for a revamp of the core VSAN software.

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Making All-Flash 3D TLC SSD Arrays Enterprise Ready

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Good post by George Crump (thank you)

All-Flash Array Vendors are now releasing systems with 3D TLC SSDs. They claim that they have reached price parity, without data efficiency, to mainstream data center hard disk arrays. 3D TLC NAND does bring the price per GB of flash storage down considerably, but it does carry the risk of device failure and data loss. Understanding how a vendor mitigates that risk is critical to vendor selection.

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HPE tops IDC’s all-flash array list. But look who’s not on the list

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Good post by Chris Mellor (thank you) over at El Reg

Severely narrow view of AFA industry

Research house IDC has put out an all-flash array marketscape which deliberately excludes most of the available all-flash arrays. HPE tops its AFA list.

IDC identifies three leaders:

  • EMC with its XtremIO product
  • HPE with its 3PAR 7450c
  • Pure Storage and its FlashArray //m

Can we put them in a 1-2-3 order?

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Designing Backup to replace Primary Storage

blueprint

Good post by George Crump (thank you)

Users and application owners expect that the systems they use will never go down, and if they do they will be returned to operation quickly with little data loss. In our article “Designing Primary Storage to Ease the Backup Burden” we discussed how to architect a primary storage infrastructure that is able to help meet these challenges. We call this design Protected Primary Storage. But this design can be expensive, especially if it is applied to every application in the data center.

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Market share: HP & Others up – everyone else down

IBM SVC 6.2 (with V7000) - SPC-1 520'043 IOPS

Good post by Robin Harris (thank you)

IDC’s Worldwide Total Disk Storage Systems Market for Q3 2015 had some interesting results. The thumbnail is the title of this post.

But there are a couple more details. ODM vendors – who sell direct to the hyperscale data center customers – had the fastest revenue growth of any supplier at 23.4%. HP’s revenue growth came in second at 16%, while the Others followed closely at 15.2%.

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SMR Drives: Are they too late to the game?

smr2

Good post by Petros Koutoupis (thank you)

The sudden popularity over NAND Flash has spelled doom for traditional magnetic Hard Disk Drives (HDD). For years we have been hearing how HDDs are reaching the end of their life. We have also heard the same about Tape drives, long before that. Although, it would seem that the prediction on HDDs may become a bit more of reality, sooner than expected.

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Is Deduplication Useless on Archive Data?

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Good post by George Crump (thank you)

One of the techniques that storage vendors use to reduce the cost of hard disk-based storage is deduplication. Deduplication is the elimination of redundant data across files. The technology is ideal for backup, since so much of a current copy of data is similar to the prior copy. The few extra seconds required to identify redundant data is worth the savings in disk capacity. Deduplication for primary storage is popular for all-flash arrays. While the level of redundancy is not as great, the premium price of flash makes any capacity savings important. In addition, given the excess performance of AFAs the deduplication feature can often be added without a noticeable performance impact. There is one process though where deduplication provides little value; archive. IT professionals need to measure costs differently when considering a storage destination for archive.

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Data Retention for Dummies

Good post by Chris Mellor (thank you) over at El Reg

All is confusion. The old certainties are gone. New certainties just don’t exist. The shifting shapes, players, products and technologies in the storage landscape are seen through fog. How the heck does everything fit together?

After four days in Silicon Valley meeting startups the bewilderment ratio us even higher. It’s like Dragons’ Den, where each new player is shinier and brighter than the previous one, becomes your favourite but then, as sure as eggs are eggs, will be eclipsed by the next one.

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