Native PCI Express Back-end Interconnect in FlashArray//m

Good post by Roland Dreier (thank you)

Many storage users are familiar with ALUA, or Asymmetric Logical Unit Access. This describes storage where some paths don’t work at all or give lower performance, because of standby controllers, volumes associated with a controller, or other architectural reasons.  The Pure Storage FlashArray provides symmetric access to storage — any IO to any volume on any port always gets the same performance.

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Software-Defined Storage in OpenStack

Good post by Rawlinson Rivera (thank you)

t’s time expand and showcase the strength of software-defined storage at the upcoming OpenStack Summit. Take a look at the abstract of the session I’m scheduled to participate as a speaker and lets’ get that bad boy vote in and into the schedule.

Getting the Bang for your Buck with Software-Defined Storage in OpenStack

OpenStack has become the standard infrastructure consumption layer for a variety of applications. These applications have different storage requirements and being able to provide a storage solution that matches these requirements is critical to ensure the adoption of OpenStack as the cloud platform of choice across a wide array of applications.

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Microsegmentation: How VMware Addresses the Container Security Issue

Post by Scott M. Fulton III (thank you)

Easily the most astonishing result from ClusterHQ’s most recent State of Container Usage survey [PDF] was that nearly three-fourths of 229 IT professional respondents said their data centers are running containers in a hypervisor-virtualized environment — that is to say, a container environment inside the safety of a separate virtualization layer. That figure was bolstered by about 61 percent of respondents saying that security remained a barrier to their data centers’ adoption of containers in production.

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Object storage: why, when, where… and but.

Good post by Enrico Signoretti (thank you)

In one of my latest posts I wrote about private object storage not being for everyone… especially if you don’t have the size that makes it viable… But, on the other hand we are all piling up boatloads of data and users need to access it from many different locations, applications and devices at anytime.

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Flash Storage Prices Have a Long Way to Fall. Here’s Why.

Good post by Paul Rubens (thank you)

High-performance flash-based storage is increasingly insinuating itself into enterprise infrastructure. It’s showing up in everything from server caches and directly attached storage to hybrid arrays and fully solid state storage appliances.

But corporate storage requirements are exploding, meaning enterprises will need far more storage capacity — both flash and spinning hard disk storage — in the future.

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The Guide to Selecting Flash for Virtual Environments

Good post by George Crump (thank you)

High performance flash based storage has dramatically improved the storage infrastructure’s ability to respond to the demands of servers and the applications that count on it. Nowhere does this improvement have more potential than in the virtualized server environment. The performance benefits of flash are so great that it can be deployed indiscriminately and still performance gains can be seen. But doing so may not allow the environment to take full advantage of flash performance. It may also be a much more expensive deployment model and put data at risk. Modern data centers need to understand which forms of flash and which deployment models will show the greatest return on investment while not risking any data.

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OCZ’s NVMe SSDs provide Lower Latency and Faster, more Consistent Performance

Post by George Crump (thank you)

When non-volatile flash memory-based solid-state drives (SSDs) were introduced, the protocol support included SAS/SATA. These interfaces were designed for hard disk drives (HDDs) and had more latency than was ideal for flash, but it made for easier integration of SSDs into enterprise storage systems and servers since the existing infrastructure was built around HDDs. SSDs were forced into the mold of HDD storage including the physical interface, host control interface and storage logic. Though PCIe flash drives became a step in the right direction, they lacked the ease of implementation that SAS/SATA SSDs have and do not fully expose the performance that NAND flash can offer.

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Today’s Storage: Same As It Ever Was

Good post by Stephen Foskett (thank you)

Data storage has always been one of the most conservative areas of enterprise IT. There is little tolerance for risk, and rightly so: Storage is persistent, long-lived, and must be absolutely reliable. Lose a server or network switch and there is the potential for service disruption or transient data corruption, but lose a storage array (and thus the data on it) and there can be serious business consequences.

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IDC Predicts Increasing Cost of Enterprise Hard Disk Drives

Good post by Hu Yoshida (thank you)

IDC’s Worldwide Hard Disk Drive Forecast for 2015 to 2019, published in May 2015, predicts that “Slow HDD areal density (capacity per disk) growth means that a steadily increasing number of components per drive will be needed on average to reach higher capacity points, particularly for the enterprise segment. This dynamic will push the overall blended average HDD ASP higher each year over the forecast period….”

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3D NAND Poised to Break Down Flash Barriers

Good post by Scott D. Lowe (thank you)

In the early 2000s the Flash NAND manufacturers decided we were almost at a flash scaling brick wall. They assessed that 60nm was the maximum scaling they could ever achieve, but were looking into other creative solutions to allow for higher capacities without using smaller NAND cells. Here we are more than 10 years later and we have not hit a brick wall of flash NAND scaling yet, although it’s common knowledge that we are getting close to flash scaling limitations. The manufacturers can hear the familiar drum beat of progress getting ever fainter with each new generation of NAND flash.

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