Object Storage: S3 API and Security

Good post by Chris M Evans (thank you)

In the first post in this series on the S3 API, we looked at some general background information describing Amazon’s Simple Storage Service and the wealth of features it offers.  In this post we dig deeper into the way in which security features are implemented in S3.  The security aspects covered will include controlling access to data in S3; we’ll discuss the security characteristics of data at rest and in flight in another post.

Read on here

Where VSAN doesn’t shine: Sources explain EMC’s ScaleIO purpose

Good post by Chris Mellor (thank you)

EMC introduced its scale-out ScaleIO Node virtual SAN a couple of weeks ago, with hybrid flash-disk and all-flash server chassises. It overlaps as a product with EMC-owned VMware’s VSAN, and therefore EMC’s EVO:RAIL implementation of that, and also competes with scale-out all-flash arrays.

Discussions with sources have clarified EMC’s thinking on the topic, and showed that the overlap is less than originally thought.

Read on here

Object storage: why, when, where… and but.

Good post by Enrico Signoretti (thank you)

In one of my latest posts I wrote about private object storage not being for everyone… especially if you don’t have the size that makes it viable… But, on the other hand we are all piling up boatloads of data and users need to access it from many different locations, applications and devices at anytime.

Read on here

SDS – The Missing Link – Storage Automation for Application Service Catalogs

Post by Rawlinson Rivera (thank you)

Automation technologies are a fundamental dependency to all aspects of the Software-Defined Data center. The use of automation technologies not only increases the overall productivity of the software-defined data center, but it can also accelerate the adoption of today’s modern operating models.

In recent years, a subset of the core pillars of the software-defined data center has experienced a great deal of improvements with the help of automation. The same can’t be said about storage. The lack management flexibility and capable automation frameworks have kept the storage infrastructures from delivering operational value and efficiencies similar to the ones available with the compute and network pillars.

VMware’s software-defined storage technologies and its storage policy-based management framework (SPBM) deliver the missing piece of the puzzle for storage infrastructure in the software-defined data center.

Read on here

Virtual Volumes (VVols) and Replication/DR

Good post by Cormac Hogan (thank you)

There have been a number of queries around Virtual Volumes (VVols) and replication, especially since the release of KB article 2112039 which details all the interoperability aspects of VVols.

In Q1 of the KB, the question is asked “Which VMware Products are interoperable with Virtual Volumes (VVols)?” The response includes “VMware vSphere Replication 6.0.x”.

Read on here

Brocade Network Advisor Database access

Good post by Erwin van Londen (thank you)

So every now and then I get the question if it is possible to access the BNA database in order to get info which then can be used to fill an excel spreadsheet for reference purposes. The though process is that often BNA/Storage administrators don’t want server admins to fool around in BNA and accidentally make changes or configuration mistakes but in the same time be able to provide insight in the SAN from a install base and configuration perspective. Although there is nothing wrong with the intent of that thought the method is however very questionable.

Read on here

vSphere Virtual Volumes Interoperability: VAAI APIs vs VVOLs

Good post by Rawlinson Rivera (thank you)

In 2011 VMware introduced block based VAAI APIs as part of vSphere 4.1 release. This APIs helped improving performance of VMFS by providing offload of some of the heavy operations to the storage array. In subsequent release, VMware added VAAI APIs for NAS, thin provisioning, and T10 command support for Block VAAI APIs.

Now with Virtual Volumes (VVOLs) VMware is introducing a new virtual machine management and integration framework that exposes virtual disks as the primary unit of data management for storage arrays. This new framework enables array-based operations at the virtual disk level that can be precisely aligned to application boundaries with the capability of providing a policy-based management approach per virtual machine.

Read on here

Orchestrating Copy Data

Post by George Crump (thank you)

2015 will be THE year of copy data management. Multiple vendors will bring solutions to the market. Many of these solutions will leverage snapshot technology in one form or another in an effort to reduce the capacity requirements of secondary data copies needed to drive data protection, business analytics, and test/dev operations. But there is another key resource that needs to be saved; time. Copy data solutions need to provide a high level of orchestration and analysis so that system administrators can be more efficient and decrease the chance for error.

Read on here

VMware VVols is coming. Will your storage be ready for it? HP 3PAR StoreServ will be!

Good Post by Eric Siebert (thank you)

After more than three years in development, VMware Virtual Volumes (VVols) storage technology is set to ignite the storage array landscape. VMware VVols represents a major change in the vSphere storage architecture for shared storage arrays. It provides storage with VM-level granularity by introducing a 1:1 mapping of VMs to storage volumes as well as simplifies storage management through automated policy-based management. Prior to VVols, storage arrays primarily integrated with vSphere at a volume/datastore level using VMware’s Virtual Machine File System (VMFS). Moving forward, you can choose to use VMFS or VVols, with VVols offering more advanced capabilities as the preferred option.

Read on here

A Fairy Tale of Two Storage Protocols

Post by Stephen Foskett (thank you)

Once upon a time, a happy little storage protocol was born. She was loved by her father, Microsoft, and he asked her to work throughout their small kingdom, delivering packages from the castle to clients all around. Sometimes she would be given other odd jobs, like authenticating a visitor, but mostly she delivered files in the kingdom of LAN.

Read on here