Tape vs Cloud for Archive and Cold Data

Post by Joseph Ortiz (thank you)

As my colleague, George Crump, discussed in a previous article, “What is Better than Cloud Storage for Cold Data”, cloud storage is great for processing active data but becomes increasingly expensive for storing cold data that is seldom accessed. While we have previously examined a few weaknesses of cloud storage such as latency and bandwidth issues, we have not really examined the actual costs of cloud storage in any detail to see the potential costs of storing large quantities of cold data and archive data long term in the cloud, or retrieving any of that archived data until now. There is a reason that many organizations are now starting to question their decision to store large quantities of cold and archive data in the cloud long term.

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SMR Drives: Are they too late to the game?

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Good post by Petros Koutoupis (thank you)

The sudden popularity over NAND Flash has spelled doom for traditional magnetic Hard Disk Drives (HDD). For years we have been hearing how HDDs are reaching the end of their life. We have also heard the same about Tape drives, long before that. Although, it would seem that the prediction on HDDs may become a bit more of reality, sooner than expected.

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Is Deduplication Useless on Archive Data?

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Good post by George Crump (thank you)

One of the techniques that storage vendors use to reduce the cost of hard disk-based storage is deduplication. Deduplication is the elimination of redundant data across files. The technology is ideal for backup, since so much of a current copy of data is similar to the prior copy. The few extra seconds required to identify redundant data is worth the savings in disk capacity. Deduplication for primary storage is popular for all-flash arrays. While the level of redundancy is not as great, the premium price of flash makes any capacity savings important. In addition, given the excess performance of AFAs the deduplication feature can often be added without a noticeable performance impact. There is one process though where deduplication provides little value; archive. IT professionals need to measure costs differently when considering a storage destination for archive.

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Backup is not Archive

Good post by Joseph Ortiz (thank you)

In order to protect their data while dealing with explosive data growth, many organizations have started backing up their data to the cloud in an effort to reduce their storage and data center costs as well as obtaining data redundancy without the need to maintain a separate physical DR site. Many also mistakenly believe that these additional backup copies qualify as archive copies. Unfortunately, they do not.

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HGST Unveils Active Archive Object Storage System

Post by Adam Armstrong (thank you)

Today HGST (a Western Digital company) announced its new object storage system, Active Archive. The Active Archive System is designed to address the need for rapid access to massive data stores. The type of data the system predominately stores is data that is past its create and modify phase of its life, moving into its long term retention phase but still requires fast access.

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Quantum Doubles Down on Data Archiving

Post by Pedro Hernandez (thank you)

Quantum is tackling the growth of unstructured data, and its growing impact on IT budgets, with three new offerings unveiled today.

The San Jose, Calif.-based data backup specialist has taken the wraps off its new Artico NAS appliance that provides fast file services courtesy of its internal disks and while supporting data archival operations that target the company’s Lattus Object Storage hardware, Scalar tape libraries (i80, i500, i6000) or Q-Cloud Archive.

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Archiving with HP StoreAll Storage: An answer to rampant unstructured data growth

Post by Stephen Bacon (thank you)

A frequently cited challenge by large organizations is the rampant growth of unstructured data. In the past, a common response has been to simply throw more primary storage at the problem. However, that’s usually a temporary bandage at best and wholly ineffectual at worst.

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StrongBox Archive NAS solves problem of Long-term Unstructured Data Storage

Good post by Eric Slack (thank you)

Unstructured data is burying companies’ storage infrastructures. According to Gartner, files comprise 80 percent of all data, and its growth rate in enterprises will exceed 800% in five years. Compounding this problem is the need to store these data for longer periods. “Long term” used to mean 15 years, now 20 years is not uncommon, and for many companies, “forever” is becoming the norm. What’s needed is cost-effective storage, a solution that’s simple to use but able to handle the challenge of long-term data retention for unstructured data.

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Unstructured Data is distracting Backup Administrators

Post by George Crump (thank you)

File based data accounts for more than 80 percent of capacity demand and backup administrators spend most of their time protecting this unstructured data. But the remaining set, structured data, will cause the organization the most harm if it is not recoverable. This data (databases, VM Images) requires special backups and fast recoveries. The key to protecting the organization from disaster is to eliminate the unstructured data protection problem. If backup administrators could focus 100% of their time on 20% of their problem, then organizations would be in a much better position to protect themselves from a disaster.

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Creating a self-managing, self-healing tape archive

Post by Simon Watkins (thank you)

The data retention challenge

Organizations are archiving ever-expanding volumes of data for extended periods of time to deliver storage optimization and cost efficiencies, address compliance objectives, and meet information re-use requirements.

Tape’s unique blend of cost-effective, scalable, dependable, and removable storage has always delivered proven benefits when it comes to long-term data retention. A recent research paper from ESG reported that 82% of tape-using respondents surveyed anticipate increasing or maintaining their organization’s use of tape technology for long-term data retention. But, how can you verify the quality of your archived tape data over time? And, how can you feel confident that the data stored in an infrequently or never accessed tape archive will be available and retrievable when needed?

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