Tape vs Cloud for Archive and Cold Data

Post by Joseph Ortiz (thank you)

As my colleague, George Crump, discussed in a previous article, “What is Better than Cloud Storage for Cold Data”, cloud storage is great for processing active data but becomes increasingly expensive for storing cold data that is seldom accessed. While we have previously examined a few weaknesses of cloud storage such as latency and bandwidth issues, we have not really examined the actual costs of cloud storage in any detail to see the potential costs of storing large quantities of cold data and archive data long term in the cloud, or retrieving any of that archived data until now. There is a reason that many organizations are now starting to question their decision to store large quantities of cold and archive data in the cloud long term.

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Pure gives its flash boxes some 3D TLC

Post by Chris Mellor (thank you) over at El Reg

Pure Storage wants to be its flash array customers’ best friend forever with announcements lowering flash storage cost and improving its availability.

The Silicon Valley biz is now supporting 3D TLC flash, the three-bits-per-cell stuff that has an endurance long enough for enterprise use. Other flash array suppliers using this technology include HP Enterprise, Kaminario, and Dell.

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What’s a PaaS?

Post from Ben Finkel and Garth Schulte (thank you)

With spending on Platform-as-a-Service expected to exceed $20 billion in this decade, Web developers need to get a firm understanding of the technology.

The recent explosion of public cloud services has made a dramatic impact across all fields in the IT industry. No one involved in this field can afford to ignore the trends and features that the cloud brings, all of which promise to continue to upend our industry for the foreseeable future.

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Does it matter how we define ‘hyperconverged’?

Post by Edward Grigson (thank you)

A recent Twitter conversation made it clear there’s no common definition of ‘hyperconverged infrastructure’ which leads to confusion for customers. Technical marketing and analysts can assist but understanding requirements, risk and costs yourself is always essential.

Hyperconverged infrastructure has been around for a few years (I first came across it at Gestalt IT’s SFD#2 with Nutanix back in 2012) and long enough for Gartner (here) and IDC (here) to create ‘magic quadrants’.

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Hu Yoshida on VVOL’s

Post by Hu Yoshida (thank you)

What could be the better subject than Virtual Volumes (VVol) for my first blog of the year 2015. Sometime back I wrote about VVol and its promise to change the paradigm of storage management through significant enhancement in automation and efficiency throughout the life cycle of a virtual machine (VM).  I identified it in my trends for 2015 as an example of how “Software Defined” can provide the communication between software and infrastructure to enhance the capabilities of both.

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Stop Selling Storage

Post by Martin Glassborow (thank you)

In the shower today, I thought back over a number of meetings with storage vendors I’ve had over the past couple of weeks. Almost without exception, they mentioned AWS and the other large cloud vendors as a major threat and compared their costs to them.

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Can Cloud Storage Costs Fall to Zero?

Post by Paul Rubens (thank you)

Cloud storage prices have plummeted over the last few years thanks to an ongoing price war between storage service providers.

And considerable barriers to cloud storage adoption by enterprises – security concerns, fears about letting data out of the organization, regulatory worries  – have largely been overcome.

As a result of these falling online storage prices and decrease in barriers to adoption – at least in part – 36% of all data is forecast to be stored in the cloud by 2016, compared to just 7% in 2013, according to Cirrus Files

So an important question to ask is this: how low can cloud storage prices go?

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The Bleak Future of NAND Flash Memory

Good Paper by Laura M. Grupp, John D. Davis and Steven Swanson (thank you)

In recent years, flash-based SSDs have grown enor- mously both in capacity and popularity. In high- performance enterprise storage applications, accelerating adoption of SSDs is predicated on the ability of manufacturers to deliver performance that far exceeds disks while closing the gap in cost per gigabyte. However, while flash density continues to improve, other metrics such as a reliability, endurance, and performance are all declining. As a result, building larger-capacity flash- based SSDs that are reliable enough to be useful in enterprise settings and high-performance enough to justify their cost will become challenging.

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