Data Retention for Dummies

Good post by Chris Mellor (thank you) over at El Reg

All is confusion. The old certainties are gone. New certainties just don’t exist. The shifting shapes, players, products and technologies in the storage landscape are seen through fog. How the heck does everything fit together?

After four days in Silicon Valley meeting startups the bewilderment ratio us even higher. It’s like Dragons’ Den, where each new player is shinier and brighter than the previous one, becomes your favourite but then, as sure as eggs are eggs, will be eclipsed by the next one.

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New Microsoft Exchange 2013 on Virtual SAN 6.1 Reference Architecture

Good post by Rawlinson Rivera (thank you)

A new Microsoft Exchange 2013 on Virtual SAN 6.1 is now available on the VMware Virtual SAN product Resource page.

This new VSAN-Exchreference architecture walks through the validation of Virtual SAN’s ability to support Microsoft Exchange 2013 designed to satisfy high IOPS mailbox configuration with Exchange Database Availability Groups (DAGs). The reference architecture is based on a resilient design that covers VMware vSphere clustering technology and Exchange DAG as well as data protection and recoverability design of Exchange Server 2013 with vSphere Data Protection and vSphere Site Recovery Manager.

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Getting to know the Network Block Device Transport in VMware vStroage APIs for Data Protection

Post by Abdul Rasheed (thank you)

When you backup a VMware vSphere virtual machine using vStorage APIs for Data Protection (VADP), one of the common ways to transmit data from VMware data store to backup server is through Network Block Device (NBD) transport. NBD is a Linux-like module that attaches to VMkernel and makes the snapshot of the virtual machine visible to backup server as if the snapshot is a block device on network. While NBD is quite popular and easy to implement, it is also the least understood transport mechanisms in VADP based backups.

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Combining snapshots and backups for best practice data protection

Post by Simon Watkins (thank you)

When it comes to best practice data protection for your business-critical applications, no single snapshot or backup technology can provide the complete solution. Snapshots and backups have different yet complementary roles to play for availability, backup and disaster recovery.

When you’re looking for a comprehensive, tiered and converged data protection architecture that balances availability and protection, it should not be a question of either-or but more a case of where and how to best use snapshots and backup.  

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Designing Primary Storage to Ease the Backup Burden

Good post by George Crump (thank you)

When IT planners map out their primary storage architectures they typically focus on how well the system will perform, how far it will scale and how reliable it will be. Data protection, that process that guards against corruption or system failure in primary storage or even a site disaster, is too often a secondary consideration, and often made by someone else. But what if the primary storage system could be designed to protect itself from these occurrences? Would that make it possible to simplify or even eliminate the data protection process altogether?

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Breaking through backup complexity

Post by Calvin Zito (thank you)

One of the most innovative solutions that addresses a relevant customer pain point is HP StoreOnce backup. Sometimes backup and data protection just doesn’t get the attention it should even though it usually is one of the top IT challenges that customers face. Check out a podcast I did last year with Jason Buffington from ESG, an industry expert in backup and data protection, where we talked about the state of backup.

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Not all Snapshots are the same

Good post by George Crump (thank you)

In an upcoming webinar, Storage Switzerland will make the case for using snapshots as a primary component of data protection. For this strategy to work several things are needed from the storage infrastructure. First, it must be able to keep an almost unlimited number of snapshots; second, it needs to have a replication process that can transfer those snapshot deltas (the changed blocks of data) to a safe place; and third, the entire storage infrastructure has to be very cost effective. In this column we will look at that first requirement, the ability to create and store a large amount of snapshots without impacting performance.

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Data Protection: All Starts with an Architecture

Post by Edward Haletky (thank you)

At The Virtualization Practice, we have systems running in the cloud as well as on-premises. We run a 100% virtualized environment, with plenty of data protection, backup, and recovery options. These are all stitched together using one architecture: an architecture developed through painful personal experiences. We just had an interesting failure—nothing catastrophic, but it could have been, without the proper mindset and architecture around data protection. Data protection these days does not just mean backup and recovery, but also prevention and redundancy.

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vSphere Data Protection (VDP) Replication Target details

Post by Vladan Seget (thank you)

vSphere Data Protection (VDP) product bundled with vSphere Essentials plus and higher licensing is backup and replication product which is managed through web based UI only. It’s tightly integrated to the Web based client console.

I’ve deployed the product in the past and also upgrades are quite easy to proceed too. VMware keeps making the product better with every release and adds new features. Check my latest post about VDP 5.8 for details here.

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VEEAM Invests in Faster & More Efficient Data Protection With Backup & Replication 8

Post by Didier Van Hoye (thank you)

Ever more data to protect without breaking the systems or the bank

One of my major concerns today in IT, weather it is on premises or in the cloud, is the cost, time, reliability and feasibility of backup and restores. This true for most of us. Due to the environments in which I deliver my services my main issue with backups is the quantity of data. The amount of data is staggering and growth is not showing a downward trend.

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