An overview of the new Virtual SAN 6.2 features

Good Post by Cormac Hogan (thank you)

If you were wondering why my blogging has dropped off in recent months, wonder no more. I’ve been fully immersed in the next release of VSAN. Today VMware has just announced the launch of VSAN 6.2, the next version of VMware’s Virtual SAN product. It is almost 2.5 years since we launched the VSAN beta at VMworld 2013, and almost 2 years to the day since we officially GA’ed our first release of VSAN way back in March 2014. A lot has happened since then, with 3 distinct releases in that 2 year period (6.0, 6.1 and now 6.2). For me the product has matured significantly in that 2 year period, with 3,000 customers and lots of added features. VSAN 6.2 is the most significant release we have had since the initial launch.

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SDS – The Missing Link – Storage Automation for Application Service Catalogs

Post by Rawlinson Rivera (thank you)

Automation technologies are a fundamental dependency to all aspects of the Software-Defined Data center. The use of automation technologies not only increases the overall productivity of the software-defined data center, but it can also accelerate the adoption of today’s modern operating models.

In recent years, a subset of the core pillars of the software-defined data center has experienced a great deal of improvements with the help of automation. The same can’t be said about storage. The lack management flexibility and capable automation frameworks have kept the storage infrastructures from delivering operational value and efficiencies similar to the ones available with the compute and network pillars.

VMware’s software-defined storage technologies and its storage policy-based management framework (SPBM) deliver the missing piece of the puzzle for storage infrastructure in the software-defined data center.

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Virtual Volumes (VVols) and Replication/DR

Good post by Cormac Hogan (thank you)

There have been a number of queries around Virtual Volumes (VVols) and replication, especially since the release of KB article 2112039 which details all the interoperability aspects of VVols.

In Q1 of the KB, the question is asked “Which VMware Products are interoperable with Virtual Volumes (VVols)?” The response includes “VMware vSphere Replication 6.0.x”.

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Why Virtual Volumes?

Post by Andrew Sullivan (thank you)

How many times in the last 3-4 years have you heard “Virtual Volumes”, “VVols”, “Storage Policy Based Management”, or any of the other terms associated with VMware’s newest software-defined storage technology?  I first heard about VVols in 2011, when I was still a customer, and the concept of no longer managing my virtual machine datastores, but rather simply consuming storage as needed with features applied as requested, was fascinating and exciting to me.

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How to Delete VSAN Datastore – Lab Time

Post by Vladan Seget (thank you)

In case like me, you are testing other software solutions in a lab, then you need to destroy stuff to re-claim your hardware for something else. Previously I setup a VSAN cluster in my lab. Now when done, I tested VSAN for some time, I wanted to move on and test something else. So I wanted to simply delete my VSAN datastore to have the DAS storage available.

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Slow backup of VM on VSAN Datastore

Good post by Duncan Epping (thank you)

Someone at out internal field conference asked me a question around why doing a full back up of a virtual machine on a VSAN datastore is slower then when doing the same exercise for that virtual machine on a traditional storage array. Note that the test that was conducted here was done with a single virtual machine. The best way to explain why this is is by taking a look at the architecture of VSAN. First, let me mention that the full backup of the VM on a traditional array was done on a storage system that had many disks backing the datastore on which the virtual machine was located.

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