Flash Storage Prices Have a Long Way to Fall. Here’s Why.

Good post by Paul Rubens (thank you)

High-performance flash-based storage is increasingly insinuating itself into enterprise infrastructure. It’s showing up in everything from server caches and directly attached storage to hybrid arrays and fully solid state storage appliances.

But corporate storage requirements are exploding, meaning enterprises will need far more storage capacity — both flash and spinning hard disk storage — in the future.

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OCZ’s NVMe SSDs provide Lower Latency and Faster, more Consistent Performance

Post by George Crump (thank you)

When non-volatile flash memory-based solid-state drives (SSDs) were introduced, the protocol support included SAS/SATA. These interfaces were designed for hard disk drives (HDDs) and had more latency than was ideal for flash, but it made for easier integration of SSDs into enterprise storage systems and servers since the existing infrastructure was built around HDDs. SSDs were forced into the mold of HDD storage including the physical interface, host control interface and storage logic. Though PCIe flash drives became a step in the right direction, they lacked the ease of implementation that SAS/SATA SSDs have and do not fully expose the performance that NAND flash can offer.

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Does it matter how we define ‘hyperconverged’?

Post by Edward Grigson (thank you)

A recent Twitter conversation made it clear there’s no common definition of ‘hyperconverged infrastructure’ which leads to confusion for customers. Technical marketing and analysts can assist but understanding requirements, risk and costs yourself is always essential.

Hyperconverged infrastructure has been around for a few years (I first came across it at Gestalt IT’s SFD#2 with Nutanix back in 2012) and long enough for Gartner (here) and IDC (here) to create ‘magic quadrants’.

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Making Computers That Don’t Forget

Good post by Tom Coughlin (thank you)

The 2015 IEEE IEDM Conference (celebrating its 60thanniversary in 2014) as well as a Canon USA MRAM Forum this week gave interesting insights into the latest developments and expectations for solid state memory and storage technologies. Tom Coughlin is president of Coughlin Associates.

MRAM technology appears to be poised for adoption in discrete and embedded electronic products for many applications. According to a report this year by Coughlin Associates, the total available market for MRAM devices is projected to reach over $2 B by 2019.

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