3D TLC NAND flash, your new SATA disk

2015

Good post by Luca Dell’Oca (thank you)

In 2014, in a presentation I’ve done, I’ve said to people that in 2-3 years new and cheaper flash memory would have become the standard solution for general purpose disk storage, thanks to a price per GB comparable with spinning disk. Seems that I was right after all.

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The paradigm shift in enterprise computing 10 years from now.

Good post by Erwin van Londen (thank you)

The way businesses arrange their IT infrastructure is based based upon 3 things: Compute, Networks and Storage. Two of these have had a remarkable shift in the way they operate over the last decade. The keyword here was virtualization. Both Compute and Networking have been torn apart and put together in a totally different way we were used to from the 70 to the early 2000’s.

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Today’s Storage: Same As It Ever Was

Good post by Stephen Foskett (thank you)

Data storage has always been one of the most conservative areas of enterprise IT. There is little tolerance for risk, and rightly so: Storage is persistent, long-lived, and must be absolutely reliable. Lose a server or network switch and there is the potential for service disruption or transient data corruption, but lose a storage array (and thus the data on it) and there can be serious business consequences.

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Flash + Object – The Emergence of a Two Tier Enterprise

Post by George Crump (thank you)

For as long as there has been data there has been a quest to consolidate that data onto a single, consolidated storage system, but that quest seems to never be satisfied. The problem is that there are essentially two types of data; active and archive. Active data typically needs fast I/O response time at a reasonable cost. Archive needs to be very cost effective with reasonable response times. Storage systems that try to meet both of these needs in a single system often end up doing neither particularly well. This has led to the purchase of data and/or environment specific storage systems and storage system sprawl.

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Interesting Question?

Good post by Martin Glassborow (thank you)

Are AFAs ready for legacy Enterprise Workloads? The latest little spat between EMC and HP bloggers asked that question.

But it’s not really an interesting question; a more interesting question is why would I put traditional Enterprise workloads on an AFA? Why even bother?

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Stop Selling Storage

Post by Martin Glassborow (thank you)

In the shower today, I thought back over a number of meetings with storage vendors I’ve had over the past couple of weeks. Almost without exception, they mentioned AWS and the other large cloud vendors as a major threat and compared their costs to them.

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VSAN for Direct Attach Storage and VVOL for Enterprise Storage

Good Post by Hu Yoshida (thank you)

In June of last year 2013, VMware announced VSAN. VMware Virtual SAN is embedded in the VMware vSphere kernel and enables clusters of servers with direct attached hard disk drives and solid state drives (HDD and SSD) to create a shared datastore. The management architecture of VSAN enables administrators to specify storage attributes, such as capacity, performance, and availability, in the form of policies on a per VM basis.

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The Fat Middle: Today’s Enterprise Storage Array

Good post by Stephen Foskett (thank you)

Ask any project manager if it’s possible to deliver something that is fast, good, and cheap, and they’ll laugh. The phenomenon known as the Iron Triangle limits just about everything in the world from meeting all three conflicting requirements. Yet, for the last two decades, enterprise storage array vendors have been trying to deliver just this. How’s that working out?

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Enterprise Backup or VM Specific Backup Software?

Post by George Crump (thank you)

Most vendors seem to think that selecting which backup solution to use in the data center should be a choice of either an enterprise backup or virtual machine-specific backup solution. Enterprise backup provides legacy, multi-platform protection, but often only spotty protection of the virtual environment and at a premium price. VM-specific solutions provide complete protection of the virtual environment and delivers new capabilities, but often lack key legacy features like support for physical (“bare metal”) systems and tape.

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Cloud-scale Object Storage – where do you store the cloud itself?

Post by Eric Slack (thank you)

“The Cloud”, a ubiquitous term for near limitless storage and compute capacity, may seem like a fantasy to users but the infrastructure challenges it brings are very real indeed. Just ask the ‘hyper-scale’ companies that have developed their own systems to support this explosion of data stoked by internet and the Internet of Things. Scale-out, object-based storage architectures are ideal for these unstructured data sets but the commercially available solutions cloud providers and enterprise companies must use have limits. Now “Himalaya”, the latest storage architecture from Amplidata, promises to keep the object storage cloud ahead of the data growth curve.

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