More data services in VSAN 6.2

Good Post by Andrea Mauro (thank you)

As announced some months ago, the new Virtual SAN (VSAN 6.2) will add new data services making this solution more rich that before. Version 6.1 was announced during the last VMworld editions with some interesting features, including a ROBO scenario.

But was still limited in data service: better snapshot technologies, better VMFS, but still some limits and no deduplication, no compression, no erasure coding at all.

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Memory Management in ESXi 6

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Post by Joseph Griffiths (thank you)

A good friend recently reviewed the what’s new in vSphere 6 course and has some questions.  That generated a number of really great discussions and this blog article.   At about the same time I had a customer asking why their virtual machine was showing ballooning even thou there was no memory pressure.   This generated some research and though organization into this article

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VMware Metro Storage Cluster Overview

Good post by Derek Hennessy (thank you)

VMware Metro Storage Cluster

VMware Metro Storage Cluster (vMSC) allows vCenter to stretch across two data centers in geographically dispersed locations. In normal circumstances, in vSphere 5.5 and below at least, vCenter would be deployed in Link-Mode so two vCenters can be managed as one. However, with vMSC it’s possible to have one vCenter manage all resources across two sites and leverage the underlying stretch storage and networking infrastructures. I’ve done previous blogs on NetApp MetroCluster to describe how a stretched storage cluster is spread across two disparate data centers. I’d also recommend reading a previous post done on vMSC by Paul Meehan over on www.virtualizationsoftware.com. The idea behind this post is to provide the VMware view for the MetroCluster posts and to give a better idea on how MetroCluster storage links into virtualization environments.

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VVOLs and VMware

Post by Christine Taylor (thank you)

The definition of VVOLs is simple but the effect is ground-breaking. Here is the simple definition part: Virtual Volumes (VVOL) is an out-of-band communication protocol between array-based storage services and vSphere 6.

And here is the ground-breaking part: VVOLs enables a VM to communicate its data management requirements directly to the storage array. The idea is to automate and optimize storage resources at the VM level instead of placing data services at the LUN (block storage) or the file share (NAS) level.

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A closer look at the VSAN witness appliance

Good post by Cormac Hogan (thank you)

As part of the Virtual SAN 6.1 announcements at VMworld 2015, VMware announced two new, eagerly anticipated features. The first of these is VSAN stretched cluster, allowing you to protect your virtual machines across data centers, not just racks. And the second is 2-node VSAN, which will be an excellent solution for remote office/branch office (ROBO) configurations.

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Getting to know the Network Block Device Transport in VMware vStroage APIs for Data Protection

Post by Abdul Rasheed (thank you)

When you backup a VMware vSphere virtual machine using vStorage APIs for Data Protection (VADP), one of the common ways to transmit data from VMware data store to backup server is through Network Block Device (NBD) transport. NBD is a Linux-like module that attaches to VMkernel and makes the snapshot of the virtual machine visible to backup server as if the snapshot is a block device on network. While NBD is quite popular and easy to implement, it is also the least understood transport mechanisms in VADP based backups.

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Rumors, strategies and facts about Hyper-converged

Good post by Enrico Signoretti (thank you)

A few weeks ago I attended SFD7. Most of the conversations we had during the event where about hyper-converge. And we had at least three meetings where hyper-convergence was at the center of the stage: Maxta, Springpath and VMware. The market is very active, to say the least, and still in a very effervescently expanding phase.

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EVO:RAIL – Under The Covers – Networking (Part1)

Post by Mike Laverik (thank you)

This is a topic I’ve written about previously in a blogpost called “Getting the RTFM In place”. Typically enterprise products are generally easy to setup so long as you have got your pre-requisites in place – fail to do that and your mileage will vary significantly. You’d be surprised (or perhaps not!) how frequently things go awry in life simple because the basics haven’t even been addressed. So despite having written about this before I want to touch on this topic again – this time adding steps the guy charged with the setup routine can follow. My apologies in advance if anyone thinks I’m teaching Grandma how to suck eggs. To be honest most of this is well documented in our EVO:RAIL User Guide. But heck, who downloads and reads an 8-page PDF before holding their nose and jumping in with both feet?

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When To Use Multiple Subnet iSCSI Network Design

Good post by Chris Wahl (thank you)

I’ve had a few readers send in questions around their iSCSI network design as it pertains to an ESXi environment. The main confusion is when to use multiple subnets for iSCSI, as opposed to VMkernel binding, based on various vendor documents and best practice guides.

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A closer look at SpringPath

Good post by Cormac Hogan (thank you)

Another hyper-converged storage company has just emerged out of stealth. Last week I had the opportunity to catch up with the team from SpringPath (formerly StorVisor), based in Silicon Valley. The company has a bunch of ex-VMware folks on-board, such as Mallik Mahalingam and Krishna Yadappanavar. Mallik and Krishna were both involved in a number of I/O related initiatives during their time at VMware. Let’s take a closer look at their new hyper-converged storage product.

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