vSphere tackles the Hyperconverged Infrastructure World: VMware VSAN 6.2

Good Post by W. Curtis Preston (thank you)

VMware is releasing VSAN 6.2, the third major release of VSAN since its introduction in August of 2014. (Like other VMware companion products, the release number is tied to the vSphere release number it is associated with.) This release gives vSphere most if not all of the major features found in other hyperconverged infrastructure products.

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NVMe fabric flash and deduping VSAN lead

The Future Road Sign with dramatic clouds and sky.

Good post by Chris Mellor (thank you)over at El Reg

EMC has new storage products coming in both external shared array form and in its converged and hyper-converged systems lines of products, using new VSAN capabilities.

These will be announced over the next two quarters and will change the shape of EMC’s product lines. We think we now have an overall view of what the mainstream product lines will look like.

This information comes from EMC’s latest quarterly results earnings call, from various sources, and from blogs by EMC VCE president Chad Sakac.

The background includes the point that VMware’s VSAN/EVO:RAIL/EMC VSPEX Blue products have not apparently been successful, hence the need for a revamp of the core VSAN software.

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Network, your next big storage problem!

data

Good post by Enrico Signoretti (thank you)

A few days ago I had an interesting chat with Andy Warfield at Coho Data and the topic of Network/Storage relationship came up several times. (Quick disclaimer: I’m currently doing some work for Coho)

In a couple of my latest articles (here and here) I talked about why many large IT organizations prefer PODs to other topologies for their datacenters but I totally forgot to talk about networking (I also have to admit that networking is not my field at all). So, this article could be the right follow-up for those posts.

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Pure gives its flash boxes some 3D TLC

Post by Chris Mellor (thank you) over at El Reg

Pure Storage wants to be its flash array customers’ best friend forever with announcements lowering flash storage cost and improving its availability.

The Silicon Valley biz is now supporting 3D TLC flash, the three-bits-per-cell stuff that has an endurance long enough for enterprise use. Other flash array suppliers using this technology include HP Enterprise, Kaminario, and Dell.

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Backup is not Archive

Good post by Joseph Ortiz (thank you)

In order to protect their data while dealing with explosive data growth, many organizations have started backing up their data to the cloud in an effort to reduce their storage and data center costs as well as obtaining data redundancy without the need to maintain a separate physical DR site. Many also mistakenly believe that these additional backup copies qualify as archive copies. Unfortunately, they do not.

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The Storage Requirements for 100% Virtualization

Post by George Crump (thank you)

After a rapid move from test to production, virtualization of existing servers in many companies seems to slow down. While it is true that most data centers have adopted a virtualize first philosophy, getting those older, mission critical workloads virtualized seems to be a thorny issue. These applications are often at the heart of an organization’s revenue or customer interaction and tend to be unpredictable in the resources they require. This is especially true when it comes to storage and networking.

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Hardware First – Designing All-Flash Arrays From a Hardware First Perspective

Good post by George Crump (thank you)

Data centers have to meet the increasing performance demands of scale out databases, big data analytics, and dense virtual environments. These data centers need to meet these demands without requiring more data center floor space or consuming more power. All-flash arrays seem to be the “default” answer to today’s storage performance problems. But all of these systems are not created equal. How the all-flash hardware and software are designed, and how these two components work together, will impact short-term results and long-term potential of the flash investment.

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Samsung announces 16TB SSD

Post by Robin Harris (thank you)

Not just the world’s highest capacity SSD, but the world’s highest capacity drive of any type. The PM1633 uses Samsung’s new 48 layer V-NAND, itself a technical tour-de-force, and represents a new thrust in flash storage beyond performance: capacity.

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3D NAND Poised to Break Down Flash Barriers

Good post by Scott D. Lowe (thank you)

In the early 2000s the Flash NAND manufacturers decided we were almost at a flash scaling brick wall. They assessed that 60nm was the maximum scaling they could ever achieve, but were looking into other creative solutions to allow for higher capacities without using smaller NAND cells. Here we are more than 10 years later and we have not hit a brick wall of flash NAND scaling yet, although it’s common knowledge that we are getting close to flash scaling limitations. The manufacturers can hear the familiar drum beat of progress getting ever fainter with each new generation of NAND flash.

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SSD Endurance. What does it mean to you?

Good post by Andrey Kudryavtsev (thank you)

I continuously think about the endurance aspect of our products, how SSD users understand it and use it for its positive benefits. Sadly, endurance is often underestimated and sometimes overestimated. I see customers buying High Endurance products for the benefit of protection, without understanding the real requirements of the application. Now that piece of night thoughts goes to my blog.

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