Network, your next big storage problem!

data

Good post by Enrico Signoretti (thank you)

A few days ago I had an interesting chat with Andy Warfield at Coho Data and the topic of Network/Storage relationship came up several times. (Quick disclaimer: I’m currently doing some work for Coho)

In a couple of my latest articles (here and here) I talked about why many large IT organizations prefer PODs to other topologies for their datacenters but I totally forgot to talk about networking (I also have to admit that networking is not my field at all). So, this article could be the right follow-up for those posts.

Read on here

Network change – who is in control?

Post by John Harrington (thank you)

Network Change

Nothing sparks engineering debate quite as much as ‘network change control’. It’s one of those topics we love to hate. We feel buried by useless bureaucracy. We ask, ‘Why can’t our managers just trust us, instead of weighing us down with meaningless process and red tape’?

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The Storage Requirements for 100% Virtualization

Post by George Crump (thank you)

After a rapid move from test to production, virtualization of existing servers in many companies seems to slow down. While it is true that most data centers have adopted a virtualize first philosophy, getting those older, mission critical workloads virtualized seems to be a thorny issue. These applications are often at the heart of an organization’s revenue or customer interaction and tend to be unpredictable in the resources they require. This is especially true when it comes to storage and networking.

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The paradigm shift in enterprise computing 10 years from now.

Good post by Erwin van Londen (thank you)

The way businesses arrange their IT infrastructure is based based upon 3 things: Compute, Networks and Storage. Two of these have had a remarkable shift in the way they operate over the last decade. The keyword here was virtualization. Both Compute and Networking have been torn apart and put together in a totally different way we were used to from the 70 to the early 2000’s.

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The Benefits of a Cloud Integrated Hyper-converged Architecture

Post by George Crump (thank you)

Hyper-converged architectures (HCA) consolidate compute, storage and networking onto a single server and then through software, aggregate these servers, creating a shared pool of resources. These resources can then be allocated to virtual machines (VMs) based on their performance and capacity demands. The goal is to simplify the purchasing, implementation and operation of the data center by consolidating or converging it. The logical next step for HCA is to extend its capabilities to the cloud allowing data centers of all sizes to achieve greater flexibility and resilience from disaster.

Raed on here

FCoE is dead! (For real)

Good post by Enrico Signoretti (thank you)

How many times have you heard this statement? Tape is dead! Mainframe is dead! So on and so forth… it turned out not to be true, most of the times it was just a way to say that a newer technology was seeing a strong adoption, so strong as to eclipse the older one in the eyes of the masses. But, in the case of FCoE, it is slightly different.

Read on here (also look at the comments section !)

VMware Virtual SAN Health Check Plugin

Post by Rawlinson Rivera (thank you)

Introducing the Virtual SAN Health Check Plugin, a tool designed to deliver a simplified troubleshooting and monitoring experience of all things Virtual SAN for vSphere Administrators. This plugin delivers over thirty different health checks specifically for Virtual SAN ranging from hardware compatibility, networking configuration, operations, advanced configuration options, storage device, and virtual machines.

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Brocade Network Advisor Database access

Good post by Erwin van Londen (thank you)

So every now and then I get the question if it is possible to access the BNA database in order to get info which then can be used to fill an excel spreadsheet for reference purposes. The though process is that often BNA/Storage administrators don’t want server admins to fool around in BNA and accidentally make changes or configuration mistakes but in the same time be able to provide insight in the SAN from a install base and configuration perspective. Although there is nothing wrong with the intent of that thought the method is however very questionable.

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EVO:RAIL – Under The Covers – Networking (Part1)

Post by Mike Laverik (thank you)

This is a topic I’ve written about previously in a blogpost called “Getting the RTFM In place”. Typically enterprise products are generally easy to setup so long as you have got your pre-requisites in place – fail to do that and your mileage will vary significantly. You’d be surprised (or perhaps not!) how frequently things go awry in life simple because the basics haven’t even been addressed. So despite having written about this before I want to touch on this topic again – this time adding steps the guy charged with the setup routine can follow. My apologies in advance if anyone thinks I’m teaching Grandma how to suck eggs. To be honest most of this is well documented in our EVO:RAIL User Guide. But heck, who downloads and reads an 8-page PDF before holding their nose and jumping in with both feet?

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Analyst Blog: What are Converged Infrastructures? Part 1 – Hardware Convergence

Good post by George Crump (thank you)

Every so often it makes sense to take a step back and attempt to define the terms that we in the industry use to describe the approaches we take to solving customer problems. One of those is “converged architectures”. When defining anything in the IT industry you have to strike a balance to make sure that the definition is specific enough to be useful, but not so detailed that it becomes a product definition instead of a category definition.

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