What’s All The Fuss About Hyper-Converged Infrastructure?

Post by Anita Kibunguchy (thank you)

Technology has made it so easy that customers looking to purchase a product or service need to simply look online for reviews. Did you know that 80% of people try new things because of recommendations from friends? It’s the reason why e-commerce companies like Amazon have thrived! Customers want to hear what other customers have to say about: The product, their experience with the brand, durability, support, purchase decisions, recommendations … the list goes on. This is no different in the B2B space. That is why IT Central Station is such an invaluable resource for customers looking to adopt new technologies like hyper-converged infrastructure (HCI) with VMware Virtual SAN. Customers get a chance to read unbiased product reviews from the tech community which makes them smart and much more informed buyers.

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NVMe fabric flash and deduping VSAN lead

The Future Road Sign with dramatic clouds and sky.

Good post by Chris Mellor (thank you)over at El Reg

EMC has new storage products coming in both external shared array form and in its converged and hyper-converged systems lines of products, using new VSAN capabilities.

These will be announced over the next two quarters and will change the shape of EMC’s product lines. We think we now have an overall view of what the mainstream product lines will look like.

This information comes from EMC’s latest quarterly results earnings call, from various sources, and from blogs by EMC VCE president Chad Sakac.

The background includes the point that VMware’s VSAN/EVO:RAIL/EMC VSPEX Blue products have not apparently been successful, hence the need for a revamp of the core VSAN software.

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Amazon, Azure and Google in race to the bottom … of cloud storage pricing

cw054-running-the-race-winning-the-prize

Good post by Chris Mellor (thank you) over at El Reg

Storage 2016 A period of quiet, rest and reflection is what the storage industry needs after a frankly hectic and very eventful 2015.

It won’t get it. The opposing forces of simplicity and complexity, access speed versus capacity, server versus array, on premises versus cloud, and tuned hardware and software versus software-defined are still in deep conflict. And don’t forget the containerisation issues in the background.

There is also a growing generalised attack on storage data access latency, just to add something else into the mix.

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Data Retention for Dummies

Good post by Chris Mellor (thank you) over at El Reg

All is confusion. The old certainties are gone. New certainties just don’t exist. The shifting shapes, players, products and technologies in the storage landscape are seen through fog. How the heck does everything fit together?

After four days in Silicon Valley meeting startups the bewilderment ratio us even higher. It’s like Dragons’ Den, where each new player is shinier and brighter than the previous one, becomes your favourite but then, as sure as eggs are eggs, will be eclipsed by the next one.

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What is NVMe? And what does it mean for PCIe-SSD?

Good post by George Crump (thank you)

There are two constants in data center storage; the need for greater performance and the need for greater capacity. Flash based storage devices have become the go-to option to address the first challenge. But application owners and users quickly move from an initial euphoria with flash performance to demanding more. Since the flash NAND is essentially the constant in the equation, the surrounding infrastructure has to evolve to extract optimal performance from the technology. But achieving maximum performance often leads to proprietary architectures and designs. NVMe (Non Volatile Memory) is a new industry standard that enables data centers to realize full flash potential without compatibility headaches.

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The paradigm shift in enterprise computing 10 years from now.

Good post by Erwin van Londen (thank you)

The way businesses arrange their IT infrastructure is based based upon 3 things: Compute, Networks and Storage. Two of these have had a remarkable shift in the way they operate over the last decade. The keyword here was virtualization. Both Compute and Networking have been torn apart and put together in a totally different way we were used to from the 70 to the early 2000’s.

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NAND, DRAM, SAS/SCSI and SATA/AHCI: Not Dead, Yet

Post by Greg Schulz (thank you)

Manufacturers are coming out with new non-volatile memory (NVM) media like 3D XPoint. Does that mean that DRAM and other NVM media such as NAND flash are now dead?

Do new NVM storage access protocols such as NVM Express (NVMe) mean SCSI/SAS and AHCI/SATA are now dead?

My simple answer is no, they all have bright futures.

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OCZ’s NVMe SSDs provide Lower Latency and Faster, more Consistent Performance

Post by George Crump (thank you)

When non-volatile flash memory-based solid-state drives (SSDs) were introduced, the protocol support included SAS/SATA. These interfaces were designed for hard disk drives (HDDs) and had more latency than was ideal for flash, but it made for easier integration of SSDs into enterprise storage systems and servers since the existing infrastructure was built around HDDs. SSDs were forced into the mold of HDD storage including the physical interface, host control interface and storage logic. Though PCIe flash drives became a step in the right direction, they lacked the ease of implementation that SAS/SATA SSDs have and do not fully expose the performance that NAND flash can offer.

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Why SSDs are obsolete

Post by Robin Harris (thank you)

Solid State Drives – SSDs – are a product of convenience, not good architecture. Storage systems need to be re-architected to achieve the highest performance of NAND flash and, soon, byte-addressable non-volatile memory. Here’s an example.

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How Flash is Changing Data Storage

Post by Paul Rubens (thank you)

Moving storage services into storage devices may not be what storage software vendors want, but it will offer many benefits to enterprises.

Falling processor and memory prices mean it’s economically feasible to beef up the computing power on storage hardware devices. That’s opening up some exciting possibilities for smart flash drives.

To understand why, you need to consider what exactly goes on in solid state drives. Unlike the spinning hard drives, flash drives can’t overwrite any arbitrary area of the storage medium.  In particular, they can’t write new data to a partially used  block – they have to write to a previously erased (or never used) block.

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