Object stores? more, fast and small!

Good post by Enrico Signoretti (thank you)

A couple of weeks ago I published an article about high performance object storage. Reactions have been quite diverse. Some think that object stores can only be huge and slow and then others who think quite the opposite. In fact, they can also be fast and small.

In the last year I’ve had a lot of interesting conversations with end users and vendors concerning this topic. Having just covered the part about “fast object stores”, again I’d like to point out that by fast I mean faster and with better latency than traditional object stores, but not as fast as block storage. This time round I’d like to talk about smaller object stores.

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Object Storage: S3 API and Security

Good post by Chris M Evans (thank you)

In the first post in this series on the S3 API, we looked at some general background information describing Amazon’s Simple Storage Service and the wealth of features it offers.  In this post we dig deeper into the way in which security features are implemented in S3.  The security aspects covered will include controlling access to data in S3; we’ll discuss the security characteristics of data at rest and in flight in another post.

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Data Retention for Dummies

Good post by Chris Mellor (thank you) over at El Reg

All is confusion. The old certainties are gone. New certainties just don’t exist. The shifting shapes, players, products and technologies in the storage landscape are seen through fog. How the heck does everything fit together?

After four days in Silicon Valley meeting startups the bewilderment ratio us even higher. It’s like Dragons’ Den, where each new player is shinier and brighter than the previous one, becomes your favourite but then, as sure as eggs are eggs, will be eclipsed by the next one.

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Peak Fibre Channel

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Good post by Tony Bourke (thank you)

There have been several articles talking about the death of Fibre Channel. This isn’t one of them. However, it is an article about “peak Fibre Channel”. I think, as a technology, Fibre Channel is in the process of (if it hasn’t already) peaking.

There’s a lot of technology in IT that doesn’t simply die. Instead, it grows, peaks, then slowly (or perhaps very slowly) fades. Consider Unix/RISC.

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Too much of a Good Thing? IBM Buys Cleversafe

Good post by George Crump (thank you)

The industry is mesmerized by all things flash and sometimes forgets that IT professionals have other challenges to face than just meeting the performance demands of the modern data center. One of those is dealing with unstructured data. Data centers are drowning in data and are looking for solutions that can cost-effectively and reliably, store all of it. Despite its slower than expected adoption rate, object storage remains an ideal way to store and retain all the data that organizations capture. To that end, IBM has purchased one of the top companies in the object storage market; Cleversafe.

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Flash + Object – The Emergence of a Two Tier Enterprise

Post by George Crump (thank you)

For as long as there has been data there has been a quest to consolidate that data onto a single, consolidated storage system, but that quest seems to never be satisfied. The problem is that there are essentially two types of data; active and archive. Active data typically needs fast I/O response time at a reasonable cost. Archive needs to be very cost effective with reasonable response times. Storage systems that try to meet both of these needs in a single system often end up doing neither particularly well. This has led to the purchase of data and/or environment specific storage systems and storage system sprawl.

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HGST Unveils Active Archive Object Storage System

Post by Adam Armstrong (thank you)

Today HGST (a Western Digital company) announced its new object storage system, Active Archive. The Active Archive System is designed to address the need for rapid access to massive data stores. The type of data the system predominately stores is data that is past its create and modify phase of its life, moving into its long term retention phase but still requires fast access.

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Quantum Doubles Down on Data Archiving

Post by Pedro Hernandez (thank you)

Quantum is tackling the growth of unstructured data, and its growing impact on IT budgets, with three new offerings unveiled today.

The San Jose, Calif.-based data backup specialist has taken the wraps off its new Artico NAS appliance that provides fast file services courtesy of its internal disks and while supporting data archival operations that target the company’s Lattus Object Storage hardware, Scalar tape libraries (i80, i500, i6000) or Q-Cloud Archive.

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2015 Storage Technology Predictions from an Insider

Post by Craig Nunes (thank you)

  1. The Death of 10K RPM Drives. Why? The cost per usable GB of flash will match 10K rpm SAS drives this year.

I have said this in the past and 2015 will be no different—the best thing we in the vendor community can do for our customers is to drive down the cost of flash as low as absolutely possible while also
maintaining the resiliency and wear handling that data centers require. 2014 brought the availability of “data center quality” flash at $2.00 per usable GB with the combination of large capacity 1.92GB flash drives and compaction technologies. This was significant in that $2/usable GB is the same cost as 15K rpm SAS drives, and accordingly (I can say for my employer) we shipped more flash capacity in the second half of the year than 15K rpm disk capacity.

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