Tracking down noisy neighbors

Good post by Frank Denneman (thank you)

A big part of resource management is sizing of the virtual machines. Right-sizing the virtual machines allows IT teams to optimize the resource utilization of the virtual machines. Right sizing has become a tactical tool for enterprise IT-teams to ensure maximum workload performance and efficient use of the physical infrastructure. Another big part of resource management is keeping track of resource utilization, some of these processes are a part of the daily operation tasks performed by specialized monitoring teams or the administrators themselves. Service Providers usually cannot influence the right sizing element, therefor they focus more on the monitoring part.

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Object stores? more, fast and small!

Good post by Enrico Signoretti (thank you)

A couple of weeks ago I published an article about high performance object storage. Reactions have been quite diverse. Some think that object stores can only be huge and slow and then others who think quite the opposite. In fact, they can also be fast and small.

In the last year I’ve had a lot of interesting conversations with end users and vendors concerning this topic. Having just covered the part about “fast object stores”, again I’d like to point out that by fast I mean faster and with better latency than traditional object stores, but not as fast as block storage. This time round I’d like to talk about smaller object stores.

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Snapshot 101: Copy-on-write vs Redirect-on-write

Good post by W. Curtis Preston (thank you)

There are two very different ways to create snapshots: copy-on-write and redirect-on-write. If IT is considering using the snapshot functionality of their storage system, it is essential to understand which type of snapshot it creates and the pros and cons of using either method.

Rather than the more common term volume, this column will use the term protected entity to refer to the entity being protected by a given snapshot. While it is true that the protected entity is typically a RAID volume, it is also true that some object storage systems do not use RAID. Their snapshots may be designed to protect other entities, including containers, a NAS share, etc. In this case, the protected entity may reside on a number of disk drives, but it does not reside on a volume in the RAID or LUN sense.

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vSphere tackles the Hyperconverged Infrastructure World: VMware VSAN 6.2

Good Post by W. Curtis Preston (thank you)

VMware is releasing VSAN 6.2, the third major release of VSAN since its introduction in August of 2014. (Like other VMware companion products, the release number is tied to the vSphere release number it is associated with.) This release gives vSphere most if not all of the major features found in other hyperconverged infrastructure products.

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An overview of the new Virtual SAN 6.2 features

Good Post by Cormac Hogan (thank you)

If you were wondering why my blogging has dropped off in recent months, wonder no more. I’ve been fully immersed in the next release of VSAN. Today VMware has just announced the launch of VSAN 6.2, the next version of VMware’s Virtual SAN product. It is almost 2.5 years since we launched the VSAN beta at VMworld 2013, and almost 2 years to the day since we officially GA’ed our first release of VSAN way back in March 2014. A lot has happened since then, with 3 distinct releases in that 2 year period (6.0, 6.1 and now 6.2). For me the product has matured significantly in that 2 year period, with 3,000 customers and lots of added features. VSAN 6.2 is the most significant release we have had since the initial launch.

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NVMe fabric flash and deduping VSAN lead

The Future Road Sign with dramatic clouds and sky.

Good post by Chris Mellor (thank you)over at El Reg

EMC has new storage products coming in both external shared array form and in its converged and hyper-converged systems lines of products, using new VSAN capabilities.

These will be announced over the next two quarters and will change the shape of EMC’s product lines. We think we now have an overall view of what the mainstream product lines will look like.

This information comes from EMC’s latest quarterly results earnings call, from various sources, and from blogs by EMC VCE president Chad Sakac.

The background includes the point that VMware’s VSAN/EVO:RAIL/EMC VSPEX Blue products have not apparently been successful, hence the need for a revamp of the core VSAN software.

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Network, your next big storage problem!

data

Good post by Enrico Signoretti (thank you)

A few days ago I had an interesting chat with Andy Warfield at Coho Data and the topic of Network/Storage relationship came up several times. (Quick disclaimer: I’m currently doing some work for Coho)

In a couple of my latest articles (here and here) I talked about why many large IT organizations prefer PODs to other topologies for their datacenters but I totally forgot to talk about networking (I also have to admit that networking is not my field at all). So, this article could be the right follow-up for those posts.

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Amazon, Azure and Google in race to the bottom … of cloud storage pricing

cw054-running-the-race-winning-the-prize

Good post by Chris Mellor (thank you) over at El Reg

Storage 2016 A period of quiet, rest and reflection is what the storage industry needs after a frankly hectic and very eventful 2015.

It won’t get it. The opposing forces of simplicity and complexity, access speed versus capacity, server versus array, on premises versus cloud, and tuned hardware and software versus software-defined are still in deep conflict. And don’t forget the containerisation issues in the background.

There is also a growing generalised attack on storage data access latency, just to add something else into the mix.

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Is Deduplication Useless on Archive Data?

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Good post by George Crump (thank you)

One of the techniques that storage vendors use to reduce the cost of hard disk-based storage is deduplication. Deduplication is the elimination of redundant data across files. The technology is ideal for backup, since so much of a current copy of data is similar to the prior copy. The few extra seconds required to identify redundant data is worth the savings in disk capacity. Deduplication for primary storage is popular for all-flash arrays. While the level of redundancy is not as great, the premium price of flash makes any capacity savings important. In addition, given the excess performance of AFAs the deduplication feature can often be added without a noticeable performance impact. There is one process though where deduplication provides little value; archive. IT professionals need to measure costs differently when considering a storage destination for archive.

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New Microsoft Exchange 2013 on Virtual SAN 6.1 Reference Architecture

Good post by Rawlinson Rivera (thank you)

A new Microsoft Exchange 2013 on Virtual SAN 6.1 is now available on the VMware Virtual SAN product Resource page.

This new VSAN-Exchreference architecture walks through the validation of Virtual SAN’s ability to support Microsoft Exchange 2013 designed to satisfy high IOPS mailbox configuration with Exchange Database Availability Groups (DAGs). The reference architecture is based on a resilient design that covers VMware vSphere clustering technology and Exchange DAG as well as data protection and recoverability design of Exchange Server 2013 with vSphere Data Protection and vSphere Site Recovery Manager.

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