Pure Storage’s coming high-end array: We have the details

Good post by Chris Mellor (thank you) over at El Reg

We can tell you a few more juicy details about Pure’s coming high-end array, and we’re deducing that SolidFire has a product capacity refresh coming.

What we knew was that the new range-topper would boast up to 1.5PB usable capacity using 4 and 8TB 3D NAND modules (SSDs). It would have always-on QoS, support thousands of virtual machines and be priced at less than $1GB/usable capacity.

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HPE tops IDC’s all-flash array list. But look who’s not on the list

idc-logo

Good post by Chris Mellor (thank you) over at El Reg

Severely narrow view of AFA industry

Research house IDC has put out an all-flash array marketscape which deliberately excludes most of the available all-flash arrays. HPE tops its AFA list.

IDC identifies three leaders:

  • EMC with its XtremIO product
  • HPE with its 3PAR 7450c
  • Pure Storage and its FlashArray //m

Can we put them in a 1-2-3 order?

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Data Retention for Dummies

Good post by Chris Mellor (thank you) over at El Reg

All is confusion. The old certainties are gone. New certainties just don’t exist. The shifting shapes, players, products and technologies in the storage landscape are seen through fog. How the heck does everything fit together?

After four days in Silicon Valley meeting startups the bewilderment ratio us even higher. It’s like Dragons’ Den, where each new player is shinier and brighter than the previous one, becomes your favourite but then, as sure as eggs are eggs, will be eclipsed by the next one.

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Pure gives its flash boxes some 3D TLC

Post by Chris Mellor (thank you) over at El Reg

Pure Storage wants to be its flash array customers’ best friend forever with announcements lowering flash storage cost and improving its availability.

The Silicon Valley biz is now supporting 3D TLC flash, the three-bits-per-cell stuff that has an endurance long enough for enterprise use. Other flash array suppliers using this technology include HP Enterprise, Kaminario, and Dell.

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How often do you upgrade your storage array software?

Good post by Alex Galbraith (thank you)

Upgrades are scary!

Having managed and implemented upgrades on highly available systems such as the old Sun StorageTech line of rebranded HDS USP/VSP arrays back in the day, I can tell you that we did not take upgrades lightly!

Unless there was a very compelling reason for an upgrade, the line taken was always “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”, but then we were looking after storage in a massively high security environment where even minor changes were taken very seriously indeed.

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Native PCI Express Back-end Interconnect in FlashArray//m

Good post by Roland Dreier (thank you)

Many storage users are familiar with ALUA, or Asymmetric Logical Unit Access. This describes storage where some paths don’t work at all or give lower performance, because of standby controllers, volumes associated with a controller, or other architectural reasons.  The Pure Storage FlashArray provides symmetric access to storage — any IO to any volume on any port always gets the same performance.

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5 Takeaways on XtremIO 4.0 from EMC World 2015

Post by Vaughn Stewart (thank you)

Like most in the storage industry, I’ve been paying close attention to EMC World 2015. In the absence of a genuine industry technical conference, EMC World provides the market with insight and perspective from the industry’s king-pin; an unveiling of the efforts of EMC engineering and a glimpse of where their sales and marketing efforts will be focused. While the EMC product portfolio spans a broad gamut, from cloud software to development platforms, enterprise storage remains EMC’s core competency.

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Five Reasons to run MS-SQL on All-Flash

Post by George Crump (thank you)

Applications are often the key service that data centers provide to their organizations. The speed at which these applications can respond to the user’s requests is often THE measurement of how IT is perceived by the organization. As a result IT departments spend a lot of time and resources making sure the database application is running at peak performance at all times.

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What are IOPS and should you care?

Post by George Crump (thank you)

When evaluating a new storage system, especially an all-flash array, the number of IOPS (Inputs/Outputs per Second) that the storage system can sustain is often used to differentiate one storage system from another. But is this really a standard that has any merit given the demands of today’s data center and the capabilities of today’s storage systems?

There are three factors that when combined tell the full story of storage performance; bandwidth rate, latency and IOPS. Most storage vendors tend to focus on IOPS to brag about how fast their storage system is. But measuring storage system performance by IOPS only has value if the workloads using that storage system are IOPS demanding.

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The State of Deduplication in 2015

Good post by George Crump (thank you)

At its core, deduplication is an enabling technology. First, it enabled disk based backup devices to become the primary backup target in the data center. Now it promises to enable the all-flash data center by driving down the cost of flash storage. Just as deduplication became the table stake for backup appliances, it is now a required capability for flash and hybrid primary storage.

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