Object Storage: S3 API and Security

Good post by Chris M Evans (thank you)

In the first post in this series on the S3 API, we looked at some general background information describing Amazon’s Simple Storage Service and the wealth of features it offers.  In this post we dig deeper into the way in which security features are implemented in S3.  The security aspects covered will include controlling access to data in S3; we’ll discuss the security characteristics of data at rest and in flight in another post.

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Protecting Compliance in the Public Cloud

Post by Christine Taylor (thank you)

When it comes to compliance, different regulations exist for different industries. For example, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) is the granddaddy of healthcare-related compliance. Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) oversees the credit card industry, while Sarbanes–Oxley (SOX) regulates the reliability of financial reporting by public companies and their accounting firms. The Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act (GLBA) administers a large set of compliance regulations for banks, investment institutions and insurance firms. And there are many more including US–EU Safe Harbor, ISO, FDA and a whole set of federal regulations around information processing, security management and risk management.

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Microsegmentation: How VMware Addresses the Container Security Issue

Post by Scott M. Fulton III (thank you)

Easily the most astonishing result from ClusterHQ’s most recent State of Container Usage survey [PDF] was that nearly three-fourths of 229 IT professional respondents said their data centers are running containers in a hypervisor-virtualized environment — that is to say, a container environment inside the safety of a separate virtualization layer. That figure was bolstered by about 61 percent of respondents saying that security remained a barrier to their data centers’ adoption of containers in production.

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Cloud Integrated Backup and DR

Post by Colm Keegan (thank you)

The best way to ensure data and application recoverability is to conduct frequent DR testing. The problem is that many organizations rarely, if ever, perform DR testing because it is time consuming, expensive and often it has limited value because the tests are not “real world”. But if there was a way to integrate simple and effective DR testing into the backup environment, this could give businesses a cost-effective solution to test application recoverability. Moreover, if the backup environment could be further leveraged to facilitate near instantaneous application fail-over capabilities into the cloud with production level performance, this would significantly bolster business application availability and service levels.

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Fabric Security

Post bc Erwin van Londen (thank you)

This topic is hardly ever touched when fabric designs are developed and discussed among storage engineers but for me this always sits on my TODO list before hooking up any HBA or array port. It is as important in the storage world as it has been in the IP networking sector for decades. Historically the reasoning to not pay attention to this topic was that the SAN was always deeply embedded in tightly controlled data-centres with strict access policies. Additionally the use of fibre-optics and relatively complex architectures to the storage un-inaugurated even more, unfairly, devalued the necessity of implementing security policies.

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5 advantages HP StoreOnce Backup brings to cloud service providers

Post by Srikanth Venkata Seshu (thank you)

In my last post, I talked about what every cloud service provider needs to know about BaaS. I showed how BaaS offerings can be structured and some of the key considerations for cloud service providers looking to add BaaS to their portfolios. Now I’m going to continue where I left off by talking about HP’s Cloud Backup Service Ready Solution, based on HP StoreOnce Backup.

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Ensuring the Future of Data Archiving

Post by Henry Newman (thank you)

The word “archive” has been thrown around for years and means lots of things to lots of different people. Hardware vendors offer various archive platforms, including tape, disk and optical, and some claim NAND flash will be used for archive eventually too. I could talk about the advantages and disadvantages of various hardware mediums for archive, but when the rubber meets the road, it is the software that is going to ensure that your data can be accessed after it is archived.

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The Inevitability of the Hybrid Cloud

Post by Archie Hendryx (thank you)

How have most organizations been building hybrid clouds to date?

Despite all the marketing and promotion surrounding the benefits of dynamically bursting into a hybrid cloud from inception, this rarely seems to be the case. If anything the current trend towards building hybrid clouds still stems from an organic growth and demand that has emanated from either an existent public or private cloud deployment.

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Enterprise File Sync and Share: Issues and Vendors

Post by Christine Taylor (thank you)

“File sync and share” is shorthand for sharing files among multiple users and devices, and synchronizing the shared files to retain file integrity. The process is very familiar to most users as a consumer-level file sharing application, typified by vendors like Dropbox.

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Don’t Let File Sync and Share Sink Your Business

Good post by Colm Keegan (thank you)

Data “leakage” is becoming an increasing problem for businesses today given the widespread use of consumer grade file sync and share services. To maximize their productivity, many users will sync their file data across their laptop, tablet, smartphone and home desktop computers using these cloud file sync and share applications.

IT organizations have neither insight nor control over any of this information. In addition, many of these services don’t employ stringent security access protocols; users simply provide login credentials to gain access to their accounts. This can potentially result in sensitive business data being exposed to unauthorized users or compromised by hackers.

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