Amazon, Azure and Google in race to the bottom … of cloud storage pricing

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Good post by Chris Mellor (thank you) over at El Reg

Storage 2016 A period of quiet, rest and reflection is what the storage industry needs after a frankly hectic and very eventful 2015.

It won’t get it. The opposing forces of simplicity and complexity, access speed versus capacity, server versus array, on premises versus cloud, and tuned hardware and software versus software-defined are still in deep conflict. And don’t forget the containerisation issues in the background.

There is also a growing generalised attack on storage data access latency, just to add something else into the mix.

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Hardware First – Designing All-Flash Arrays From a Hardware First Perspective

Good post by George Crump (thank you)

Data centers have to meet the increasing performance demands of scale out databases, big data analytics, and dense virtual environments. These data centers need to meet these demands without requiring more data center floor space or consuming more power. All-flash arrays seem to be the “default” answer to today’s storage performance problems. But all of these systems are not created equal. How the all-flash hardware and software are designed, and how these two components work together, will impact short-term results and long-term potential of the flash investment.

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Throwing hardware at a software problem

Good post by Robin Harris (thank you)

Maybe software will eat the world, but sometimes the physical world gives software indigestion. That fact was evident at the Flash Memory Summit this month.

As mentioned in Flash slaying the latency dragon? several companies were showing remote storage accesses – using NVMe and hopped up networks – in the 1.5 to 2.5µsec range. That’s roughly 500 times better than the ≈1msec averages seen on today’s flash storage.

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Why i think VSAN is so desruptive

Post by Chuck Hollis (thank you)

Looking for a great disruption story in enterprise IT tech?  I think what VSAN is doing to the established storage industry deserves to be a strong candidate.

I’ve seen disruptions — small and large — come and go.  If you’re into IT infrastructure, this is one worth watching.

A few years ago, I moved from EMC to VMware on the power of that prediction.  So far, it’s played out pretty much as I had hoped it would.  There’s now clearly a new dynamic in the ~$35B storage industry, and VMware’s Virtual SAN is very emblematic of the changes that are now afoot.

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Hyper-Convergence And All Flash On The Way

Post by Howard Marks (thank you)

Will a combination of the two shiniest technologies in the storage business make a match like champagne and caviar, or will it create a system looking more like a chocolate-covered pickle?

A few of my fellow storage pundits have lately taken to predicting the arrival of the all-flash hyper-converged system.

At VMworld this year, Micron was demonstrating an all-flash VSAN cluster. The company crammed a pair of Dell R610 servers with 12 core processors, 768 GB of RAM and two tiers of SSDs, a pair of 1.4 TB P420 PCIe cards to hold VSAN’s read and write caches, and 10 960 GB M500s as the “bulk storage” tier. And while some technologies —  like flash and data deduplication — go together like champagne and caviar, an all-flash hyper-converged system looks more like a chocolate-covered pickle to me.

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VMworld 2014 – EVO:RAIL and EMC’s approach

Good Post by Chad Sakac (thank you)

Before I go much farther in talking about EVO:RAIL, I want to quickly make a black and white statement – based on what I expect analysts/press misunderstanding today’s announcements (we’ll see if they do this):  VMware is NOT getting into the hardware business 🙂

Looking at the PR, and even the way EVO:RAIL is positioned as a “product” (to me, it is a OEM program, and a VMware software product –  EVO:RAIL manager – that helps OEMs build hyper-converged appliance products) I can see why people may be confused.  Let me try to make this clear:

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Scale Computing In The Goldilocks Zone

Good Post by Justin Warren (thank you)

Scale Computing know exactly what they’re doing, and they’re doing it well. The founders have built a system that is just what they wanted when they worked for mid-sized firms in the middle of America.

I had a couple of informal conversations about Scale with Silicon Valley types over the week of Storage Field Day 5, and what struck me was how they didn’t seem to understand the middle-ground. Their thinking revolved around ‘Enterprise’ or ‘Apps’, (sometimes both at once) and they just didn’t understand what Scale are doing. I guess this was part of the famously insular Valley thinking I keep hearing about.

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Software Eats the Data Center: VMware’s Gelsinger Outlines IT’s Software-Defined Future

Post by Kurt Marko (thank you)

VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger used his Interop keynote to lay out a four-pronged strategy for building what the company has coined the software defined data center, adding details and customer testimonials to a concept he initially described last year. Besides the firm’s ubiquitous server virtualization products, which abstract compute resources into customizable chunks that can be reconfigured and reallocated as needed to suit specific application needs, the strategy includes virtual networks, using NSX technology released last fall, storage virtualization provided by the recently shipping and Interop award-winning VSAN product and software to centrally and programmatically automate configuration, deployment and deployment of the entire infrastructure stack.

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Is IBM’s storage business doomed?

Post by Robin Harris (thank you) – also be sure to read the Comments

IBM’s vestigial hardware business – 15.5% of Q4 company revenue – continues to slide. This won’t end well.

In its Q4/2013 earnings call, IBM’s profits were higher than forecast, but revenues were lower. Hardware was the major culprit.

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