vSphere tackles the Hyperconverged Infrastructure World: VMware VSAN 6.2

Good Post by W. Curtis Preston (thank you)

VMware is releasing VSAN 6.2, the third major release of VSAN since its introduction in August of 2014. (Like other VMware companion products, the release number is tied to the vSphere release number it is associated with.) This release gives vSphere most if not all of the major features found in other hyperconverged infrastructure products.

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Making All-Flash 3D TLC SSD Arrays Enterprise Ready

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Good post by George Crump (thank you)

All-Flash Array Vendors are now releasing systems with 3D TLC SSDs. They claim that they have reached price parity, without data efficiency, to mainstream data center hard disk arrays. 3D TLC NAND does bring the price per GB of flash storage down considerably, but it does carry the risk of device failure and data loss. Understanding how a vendor mitigates that risk is critical to vendor selection.

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SMR Drives: Are they too late to the game?

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Good post by Petros Koutoupis (thank you)

The sudden popularity over NAND Flash has spelled doom for traditional magnetic Hard Disk Drives (HDD). For years we have been hearing how HDDs are reaching the end of their life. We have also heard the same about Tape drives, long before that. Although, it would seem that the prediction on HDDs may become a bit more of reality, sooner than expected.

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Backup is not Archive

Good post by Joseph Ortiz (thank you)

In order to protect their data while dealing with explosive data growth, many organizations have started backing up their data to the cloud in an effort to reduce their storage and data center costs as well as obtaining data redundancy without the need to maintain a separate physical DR site. Many also mistakenly believe that these additional backup copies qualify as archive copies. Unfortunately, they do not.

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What is NVMe? And what does it mean for PCIe-SSD?

Good post by George Crump (thank you)

There are two constants in data center storage; the need for greater performance and the need for greater capacity. Flash based storage devices have become the go-to option to address the first challenge. But application owners and users quickly move from an initial euphoria with flash performance to demanding more. Since the flash NAND is essentially the constant in the equation, the surrounding infrastructure has to evolve to extract optimal performance from the technology. But achieving maximum performance often leads to proprietary architectures and designs. NVMe (Non Volatile Memory) is a new industry standard that enables data centers to realize full flash potential without compatibility headaches.

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Hardware First – Designing All-Flash Arrays From a Hardware First Perspective

Good post by George Crump (thank you)

Data centers have to meet the increasing performance demands of scale out databases, big data analytics, and dense virtual environments. These data centers need to meet these demands without requiring more data center floor space or consuming more power. All-flash arrays seem to be the “default” answer to today’s storage performance problems. But all of these systems are not created equal. How the all-flash hardware and software are designed, and how these two components work together, will impact short-term results and long-term potential of the flash investment.

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How often do you upgrade your storage array software?

Good post by Alex Galbraith (thank you)

Upgrades are scary!

Having managed and implemented upgrades on highly available systems such as the old Sun StorageTech line of rebranded HDS USP/VSP arrays back in the day, I can tell you that we did not take upgrades lightly!

Unless there was a very compelling reason for an upgrade, the line taken was always “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”, but then we were looking after storage in a massively high security environment where even minor changes were taken very seriously indeed.

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How can SD cards be faster than SSDs?

Good post by Robin Harris (thank you)

SD cards – postage stamp sized flash cards in your camera – have no internal cache, little internal bandwidth, tiny CPUs, and slow I/O busses. But recent tests found that SD cards could be 200 times faster than an SSD. How???

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NAND, DRAM, SAS/SCSI and SATA/AHCI: Not Dead, Yet

Post by Greg Schulz (thank you)

Manufacturers are coming out with new non-volatile memory (NVM) media like 3D XPoint. Does that mean that DRAM and other NVM media such as NAND flash are now dead?

Do new NVM storage access protocols such as NVM Express (NVMe) mean SCSI/SAS and AHCI/SATA are now dead?

My simple answer is no, they all have bright futures.

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Samsung announces 16TB SSD

Post by Robin Harris (thank you)

Not just the world’s highest capacity SSD, but the world’s highest capacity drive of any type. The PM1633 uses Samsung’s new 48 layer V-NAND, itself a technical tour-de-force, and represents a new thrust in flash storage beyond performance: capacity.

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