Tape vs Cloud for Archive and Cold Data

Post by Joseph Ortiz (thank you)

As my colleague, George Crump, discussed in a previous article, “What is Better than Cloud Storage for Cold Data”, cloud storage is great for processing active data but becomes increasingly expensive for storing cold data that is seldom accessed. While we have previously examined a few weaknesses of cloud storage such as latency and bandwidth issues, we have not really examined the actual costs of cloud storage in any detail to see the potential costs of storing large quantities of cold data and archive data long term in the cloud, or retrieving any of that archived data until now. There is a reason that many organizations are now starting to question their decision to store large quantities of cold and archive data in the cloud long term.

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SMR Drives: Are they too late to the game?

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Good post by Petros Koutoupis (thank you)

The sudden popularity over NAND Flash has spelled doom for traditional magnetic Hard Disk Drives (HDD). For years we have been hearing how HDDs are reaching the end of their life. We have also heard the same about Tape drives, long before that. Although, it would seem that the prediction on HDDs may become a bit more of reality, sooner than expected.

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Is Deduplication Useless on Archive Data?

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Good post by George Crump (thank you)

One of the techniques that storage vendors use to reduce the cost of hard disk-based storage is deduplication. Deduplication is the elimination of redundant data across files. The technology is ideal for backup, since so much of a current copy of data is similar to the prior copy. The few extra seconds required to identify redundant data is worth the savings in disk capacity. Deduplication for primary storage is popular for all-flash arrays. While the level of redundancy is not as great, the premium price of flash makes any capacity savings important. In addition, given the excess performance of AFAs the deduplication feature can often be added without a noticeable performance impact. There is one process though where deduplication provides little value; archive. IT professionals need to measure costs differently when considering a storage destination for archive.

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Backup is not Archive

Good post by Joseph Ortiz (thank you)

In order to protect their data while dealing with explosive data growth, many organizations have started backing up their data to the cloud in an effort to reduce their storage and data center costs as well as obtaining data redundancy without the need to maintain a separate physical DR site. Many also mistakenly believe that these additional backup copies qualify as archive copies. Unfortunately, they do not.

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LTO Program Announces Generation 7 Specifications

Post by Adam Armstrong (thank you)

Today the LTO Program Technology Provider Companies (HP, IBM, and Quantum) announced new specifications for the LTO Ultrium format generation 7 or LTO-7. The new specifications more than double the capacity per tape cartridge bring the capacity to 15TB (when compressed) up from 6.25TB of the previous generation. And the new specifications have even faster transfer speeds up to 750MB/s or 2.7TB/hour/drive, up from 400MB/s or 1.4TB/hour/drive of the previous generation.

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NAND, DRAM, SAS/SCSI and SATA/AHCI: Not Dead, Yet

Post by Greg Schulz (thank you)

Manufacturers are coming out with new non-volatile memory (NVM) media like 3D XPoint. Does that mean that DRAM and other NVM media such as NAND flash are now dead?

Do new NVM storage access protocols such as NVM Express (NVMe) mean SCSI/SAS and AHCI/SATA are now dead?

My simple answer is no, they all have bright futures.

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Is a Copy a Backup?

Good post by W.Curtis Preston (thank you)

Are we breaking backup in a new way by fixing it?  That’s the thought I had while interviewing Bryce Hein from Quantum. It made me think about a blog post I wrote four years ago asking whether or not snapshots and replication could be considered a backup.  The interview is an interesting one and the blog post has a lot of good points, along with quite a bit of banter in the comments section.
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FCoE is dead! (For real)

Good post by Enrico Signoretti (thank you)

How many times have you heard this statement? Tape is dead! Mainframe is dead! So on and so forth… it turned out not to be true, most of the times it was just a way to say that a newer technology was seeing a strong adoption, so strong as to eclipse the older one in the eyes of the masses. But, in the case of FCoE, it is slightly different.

Read on here (also look at the comments section !)

Quantum Doubles Down on Data Archiving

Post by Pedro Hernandez (thank you)

Quantum is tackling the growth of unstructured data, and its growing impact on IT budgets, with three new offerings unveiled today.

The San Jose, Calif.-based data backup specialist has taken the wraps off its new Artico NAS appliance that provides fast file services courtesy of its internal disks and while supporting data archival operations that target the company’s Lattus Object Storage hardware, Scalar tape libraries (i80, i500, i6000) or Q-Cloud Archive.

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Tape Data Storage Buying Guide

Post by Drew Robb (thank you)

It’s a foolish data storage professional who considers that tape isn’t worth paying attention to. The fact of the matter is that tape continues to be the medium of choice for the bulk of stored data and its usage is growing.

“Data storage and archiving requirements aren’t slowing down, so solutions that allow for smarter archiving and introducing or re-introducing tape are in high demand,” said Spectra Logic CTO Matt Starr.

As a sign of the health of tape, storage players such as, Oracle, IBM, Sony, Quantum, Spectra Logic, Fujifilm and HP have all announced new tape products in recent months. Here are some of the highlights.

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