Making All-Flash 3D TLC SSD Arrays Enterprise Ready

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Good post by George Crump (thank you)

All-Flash Array Vendors are now releasing systems with 3D TLC SSDs. They claim that they have reached price parity, without data efficiency, to mainstream data center hard disk arrays. 3D TLC NAND does bring the price per GB of flash storage down considerably, but it does carry the risk of device failure and data loss. Understanding how a vendor mitigates that risk is critical to vendor selection.

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Network, your next big storage problem!

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Good post by Enrico Signoretti (thank you)

A few days ago I had an interesting chat with Andy Warfield at Coho Data and the topic of Network/Storage relationship came up several times. (Quick disclaimer: I’m currently doing some work for Coho)

In a couple of my latest articles (here and here) I talked about why many large IT organizations prefer PODs to other topologies for their datacenters but I totally forgot to talk about networking (I also have to admit that networking is not my field at all). So, this article could be the right follow-up for those posts.

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SMR Drives: Are they too late to the game?

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Good post by Petros Koutoupis (thank you)

The sudden popularity over NAND Flash has spelled doom for traditional magnetic Hard Disk Drives (HDD). For years we have been hearing how HDDs are reaching the end of their life. We have also heard the same about Tape drives, long before that. Although, it would seem that the prediction on HDDs may become a bit more of reality, sooner than expected.

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3D TLC NAND flash, your new SATA disk

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Good post by Luca Dell’Oca (thank you)

In 2014, in a presentation I’ve done, I’ve said to people that in 2-3 years new and cheaper flash memory would have become the standard solution for general purpose disk storage, thanks to a price per GB comparable with spinning disk. Seems that I was right after all.

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Pure gives its flash boxes some 3D TLC

Post by Chris Mellor (thank you) over at El Reg

Pure Storage wants to be its flash array customers’ best friend forever with announcements lowering flash storage cost and improving its availability.

The Silicon Valley biz is now supporting 3D TLC flash, the three-bits-per-cell stuff that has an endurance long enough for enterprise use. Other flash array suppliers using this technology include HP Enterprise, Kaminario, and Dell.

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Flash Storage Prices Have a Long Way to Fall. Here’s Why.

Good post by Paul Rubens (thank you)

High-performance flash-based storage is increasingly insinuating itself into enterprise infrastructure. It’s showing up in everything from server caches and directly attached storage to hybrid arrays and fully solid state storage appliances.

But corporate storage requirements are exploding, meaning enterprises will need far more storage capacity — both flash and spinning hard disk storage — in the future.

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3D NAND Poised to Break Down Flash Barriers

Good post by Scott D. Lowe (thank you)

In the early 2000s the Flash NAND manufacturers decided we were almost at a flash scaling brick wall. They assessed that 60nm was the maximum scaling they could ever achieve, but were looking into other creative solutions to allow for higher capacities without using smaller NAND cells. Here we are more than 10 years later and we have not hit a brick wall of flash NAND scaling yet, although it’s common knowledge that we are getting close to flash scaling limitations. The manufacturers can hear the familiar drum beat of progress getting ever fainter with each new generation of NAND flash.

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A Flash Storage Technical and Economic Primer

Good post by Scott D. Lowe (thank you)

Flash memory is a type of non-volatile memory storage, which can be electrically erased and programmed. What was the event that precipitated the introduction of this new storage medium? Well, it started in the mid-1980s, when Toshiba was working on a project to create a replacement for the EEPROM, a low-cost type of non-volatile memory, which could be erased and reprogrammed. The problem with the EEPROM was its cumbersome erasure process; it needed to be exposed to an ultraviolet light source to perform a complete erasure. To overcome this challenge, the E2PROM was created. The E2PROM type of memory cell was block erasable, but it was eight times the cost of the EEPROM. The high cost of the E2PROM led to rejection from consumers who wanted the low cost of EEPROM coupled with the block erasable qualities of the E2PROM.

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Hybrids Moving to All-Flash Configurations

Post by Brian Beeler (thank you)

Often we neatly categorize storage into a few convenient buckets; Big Storage, All-Flash Arrays and Hybrids. Each has a connotation of its own, big storage includes the usual suspects like EMC, Dell, HP, IBM and the like. AFAs generally include startups or recently acquired efforts like Pure Storage, XtremIO and at times flash offerings from big storage. The hybrid category is one of the most interesting because even though all the big storage vendors offer hybrid products, this loosely refers to the startups in the space like Nimble, Tegile and StorTrends. Definitions are perpetually changing though; the idea of hybrid itself is on the move.

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Demartek Commentary — Flash Memory Summit 2014

Post by Dennis Martin (thank you)

I attended the Flash Memory Summit 2014, held in Santa Clara, California. The organizers told me that registration for this year’s annual event was approximately 5000 people, with somewhere in the vicinity of 3500-4000 people attending, which should certainly be considered a success. There were approximately 130 sessions covering a wide range of topics relating to flash memory or future technologies beyond flash memory.

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