What’s All The Fuss About Hyper-Converged Infrastructure?

Post by Anita Kibunguchy (thank you)

Technology has made it so easy that customers looking to purchase a product or service need to simply look online for reviews. Did you know that 80% of people try new things because of recommendations from friends? It’s the reason why e-commerce companies like Amazon have thrived! Customers want to hear what other customers have to say about: The product, their experience with the brand, durability, support, purchase decisions, recommendations … the list goes on. This is no different in the B2B space. That is why IT Central Station is such an invaluable resource for customers looking to adopt new technologies like hyper-converged infrastructure (HCI) with VMware Virtual SAN. Customers get a chance to read unbiased product reviews from the tech community which makes them smart and much more informed buyers.

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VMware Metro Storage Cluster Overview

Good post by Derek Hennessy (thank you)

VMware Metro Storage Cluster

VMware Metro Storage Cluster (vMSC) allows vCenter to stretch across two data centers in geographically dispersed locations. In normal circumstances, in vSphere 5.5 and below at least, vCenter would be deployed in Link-Mode so two vCenters can be managed as one. However, with vMSC it’s possible to have one vCenter manage all resources across two sites and leverage the underlying stretch storage and networking infrastructures. I’ve done previous blogs on NetApp MetroCluster to describe how a stretched storage cluster is spread across two disparate data centers. I’d also recommend reading a previous post done on vMSC by Paul Meehan over on www.virtualizationsoftware.com. The idea behind this post is to provide the VMware view for the MetroCluster posts and to give a better idea on how MetroCluster storage links into virtualization environments.

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VVOLs are more than just “per-VM”storage volumes

Good post by Luca Dell’Oca (thank you)

As I’m following closely the growth and evolution of this new technology for vSphere environments, and I’m still in search of a solution to play with VVOLs in my lab, I’ve found an article on the blogosphere and some additional comments on Twitter that made me re-think a bit about the real value of VVOLs.

It’s just a “per-VM” storage?

The original article comes from one of my favorite startups, Coho Data. In this article Suzy Visvanathan explains how Coho being an NFS-based storage doesn’t really need to support VVOLs.

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VMware Horizon 6 with View: Performance Testing

Good post by Nancy Beckus (thank you)

VMware Horizon 6 with View virtual desktops offer advantages for both end users and IT staff. End users are no longer locked to a particular machine and can access their system and files from anywhere, anytime. View transforms IT by simplifying and automating desktop and applications management. IT administrators can quickly create virtual desktops on demand based on locations and profiles.

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VMware Virtual SAN Health Check Plugin

Post by Rawlinson Rivera (thank you)

Introducing the Virtual SAN Health Check Plugin, a tool designed to deliver a simplified troubleshooting and monitoring experience of all things Virtual SAN for vSphere Administrators. This plugin delivers over thirty different health checks specifically for Virtual SAN ranging from hardware compatibility, networking configuration, operations, advanced configuration options, storage device, and virtual machines.

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How to upgrade vSphere 5.5 to version 6.0 – Part 1

Post by Marek Zdrojewski (thank you)

The latest release of VMware vSphere (version 6.0) has been generally available for a while now so it is time to look how to upgrade vSphere 5.5 environment to version 6.0.

Before you begin, make sure that you read the vSphere 6 upgrade guide, the vSphere 6 release notes, the Hardware and Guest OS Compatibility Guide and the Product Interoperability Matrix from VMware before you start the upgrade process. Also, make sure your environment meets the software and hardware requirements as described in the upgrade guide.

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EVO:RAIL – Under The Covers – Networking (Part1)

Post by Mike Laverik (thank you)

This is a topic I’ve written about previously in a blogpost called “Getting the RTFM In place”. Typically enterprise products are generally easy to setup so long as you have got your pre-requisites in place – fail to do that and your mileage will vary significantly. You’d be surprised (or perhaps not!) how frequently things go awry in life simple because the basics haven’t even been addressed. So despite having written about this before I want to touch on this topic again – this time adding steps the guy charged with the setup routine can follow. My apologies in advance if anyone thinks I’m teaching Grandma how to suck eggs. To be honest most of this is well documented in our EVO:RAIL User Guide. But heck, who downloads and reads an 8-page PDF before holding their nose and jumping in with both feet?

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Virtual Volumes primer

Good post by Duncan Epping (thank you)

I was digging through my blog for a link to a virtual volumes primer article and I realized I never wrote one. I did an article which described what Virtual Volumes (VVol) is in 2012 but that is it. I am certain that Virtual Volumes is a feature that will be heavily used with vSphere 6.0 and beyond, so it was time to write a primer. What is Virtual Volumes about? What will they bring to the table?

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Pure Storage gets closer to vCenter and SRM

Post by Chris Mellor (thank you) over at El Reg

Convergence rules. Pure Storage is making its arrays better citizens in the VMware world by better integrating its admin services with vCenter.

Forget Purity, so to speak. VMware vCenter admins can drive Pure Storage replication, snapshots and provisioning though Site Recovery Manager and a Pure plug-in.

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Analyst Blog: What are Converged Infrastructures? Part 1 – Hardware Convergence

Good post by George Crump (thank you)

Every so often it makes sense to take a step back and attempt to define the terms that we in the industry use to describe the approaches we take to solving customer problems. One of those is “converged architectures”. When defining anything in the IT industry you have to strike a balance to make sure that the definition is specific enough to be useful, but not so detailed that it becomes a product definition instead of a category definition.

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