QLogic 16Gb Gen 5 FC Now Offered on EMC VNX Hybrid Flash Storage

Post by Pedro Hernandez (thank you)

Eyeing virtualized data centers, EMC and QLogic have teamed to move VNX arrays into the storage area network (SAN) fast lane.

EMC VNX hybrid flash storage arrays are now available with QLogic’s high-speed 16Gb Fiber Channel (FC) technology, the Aliso Viejo, Calif.-based provider of storage networking components and equipment announced today. VNX is EMC’s midrange line of flash-enabled, unified storage systems (NAS and SAN). The Hopkinton, Mass.-based data storage giant overhauled VNX in 2013, including enhancements to its underlying MCx software to improve flash integration.

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VSAN Evaluation – How to use the sizing tool – Part 1

Post by Rafael Kabesa (thank you)

Sizing a vSphere environment for VMware Virtual SAN is not an easy task and if this is how you look like when you approach it you should continue reading. Nevertheless, even if you already did sizing for VSAN in the past there are some nuances that you might want to pay attention to.

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Does it matter how we define ‘hyperconverged’?

Post by Edward Grigson (thank you)

A recent Twitter conversation made it clear there’s no common definition of ‘hyperconverged infrastructure’ which leads to confusion for customers. Technical marketing and analysts can assist but understanding requirements, risk and costs yourself is always essential.

Hyperconverged infrastructure has been around for a few years (I first came across it at Gestalt IT’s SFD#2 with Nutanix back in 2012) and long enough for Gartner (here) and IDC (here) to create ‘magic quadrants’.

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A Flash Storage Technical and Economic Primer

Good post by Scott D. Lowe (thank you)

Flash memory is a type of non-volatile memory storage, which can be electrically erased and programmed. What was the event that precipitated the introduction of this new storage medium? Well, it started in the mid-1980s, when Toshiba was working on a project to create a replacement for the EEPROM, a low-cost type of non-volatile memory, which could be erased and reprogrammed. The problem with the EEPROM was its cumbersome erasure process; it needed to be exposed to an ultraviolet light source to perform a complete erasure. To overcome this challenge, the E2PROM was created. The E2PROM type of memory cell was block erasable, but it was eight times the cost of the EEPROM. The high cost of the E2PROM led to rejection from consumers who wanted the low cost of EEPROM coupled with the block erasable qualities of the E2PROM.

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Rumors, strategies and facts about Hyper-converged

Good post by Enrico Signoretti (thank you)

A few weeks ago I attended SFD7. Most of the conversations we had during the event where about hyper-converge. And we had at least three meetings where hyper-convergence was at the center of the stage: Maxta, Springpath and VMware. The market is very active, to say the least, and still in a very effervescently expanding phase.

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SDS – The Missing Link – Storage Automation for Application Service Catalogs

Post by Rawlinson Rivera (thank you)

Automation technologies are a fundamental dependency to all aspects of the Software-Defined Data center. The use of automation technologies not only increases the overall productivity of the software-defined data center, but it can also accelerate the adoption of today’s modern operating models.

In recent years, a subset of the core pillars of the software-defined data center has experienced a great deal of improvements with the help of automation. The same can’t be said about storage. The lack management flexibility and capable automation frameworks have kept the storage infrastructures from delivering operational value and efficiencies similar to the ones available with the compute and network pillars.

VMware’s software-defined storage technologies and its storage policy-based management framework (SPBM) deliver the missing piece of the puzzle for storage infrastructure in the software-defined data center.

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It’s time to “VMware” Storage

Good post by George Crump (thank you)

Before hypervisors like VMware, Hyper-V and KVM came to market, data centers had few options when it came to managing the growth of their server infrastructure. They could buy one big server that ran multiple applications, which, while it simplified operations and support, meant that one application was at the mercy of the other applications in terms of reliability and performance. Alternatively, IT professionals could buy a server for each application as it came online but this sacrificed operational efficiency and IT budget to the demands of fault and performance isolation. Until hypervisors came to market, the latter choice was considered to be the best practice.

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How to upgrade vSphere 5.5 to version 6.0 – Part 1

Post by Marek Zdrojewski (thank you)

The latest release of VMware vSphere (version 6.0) has been generally available for a while now so it is time to look how to upgrade vSphere 5.5 environment to version 6.0.

Before you begin, make sure that you read the vSphere 6 upgrade guide, the vSphere 6 release notes, the Hardware and Guest OS Compatibility Guide and the Product Interoperability Matrix from VMware before you start the upgrade process. Also, make sure your environment meets the software and hardware requirements as described in the upgrade guide.

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Virtual Volumes (VVols) and Replication/DR

Good post by Cormac Hogan (thank you)

There have been a number of queries around Virtual Volumes (VVols) and replication, especially since the release of KB article 2112039 which details all the interoperability aspects of VVols.

In Q1 of the KB, the question is asked “Which VMware Products are interoperable with Virtual Volumes (VVols)?” The response includes “VMware vSphere Replication 6.0.x”.

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HP StoreOnce SQL Plug-in: Faster, efficient backup for Microsoft SQL Server databases

Post by Ian Blatchford (thank you)

Today’s BURA Sunday blog continues conversations started in recent posts from colleagues in HP Storage that have covered storage infrastructure and protection to optimize Microsoft SQL Server deployments.

Parissa talked about how deploying SQL Server databases on HP 3PAR StoreServ 7450 would save you from the tradeoff between database performance and resiliency. All-flash storage means very low latency and Peer Persistence between two distributed 3PAR StoreServ arrays provides resiliency against catastrophic site failure. Ashwin previewed the StoreOnce plug-in that enables DBAs to run direct backups from the SQL Server database to a StoreOnce appliance. He also described some of the benefits of using HP Data Protector for organizations who want to include SQL Server database protection as part of a centralized data protection process.

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